The Role of Gender in the Formation of Perceptions of Greed, and Subsequent Social Reactions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/578552
Title:
The Role of Gender in the Formation of Perceptions of Greed, and Subsequent Social Reactions
Author:
Brandt, Shelby Simone
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
There is little work done that looks into gender and perceptions of greed. Using information from the first experiment in Anderson, (2014), this thesis looked at the possible role of gender in the formation of perceptions of greed as well as some of the subsequent social reactions. Two hypotheses were formed off of previous work done in the subject area. The first hypothesis is that even with distributive injustice, inference of selfish motive to acquire, and relative deprivation held constant, females will have greater perceptions of greed because males tend to view competition and aggression as normal, whereas females do not. The second hypothesis is that because of the greater perceptions of greed, females will also have greater moral outrage and personal anger. The data that was supposed to be used to find results was lost due to computer failure. Therefore, no conclusions could be found, only hypothetical possibilities.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mehl, Matthias

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Role of Gender in the Formation of Perceptions of Greed, and Subsequent Social Reactionsen_US
dc.creatorBrandt, Shelby Simoneen
dc.contributor.authorBrandt, Shelby Simoneen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThere is little work done that looks into gender and perceptions of greed. Using information from the first experiment in Anderson, (2014), this thesis looked at the possible role of gender in the formation of perceptions of greed as well as some of the subsequent social reactions. Two hypotheses were formed off of previous work done in the subject area. The first hypothesis is that even with distributive injustice, inference of selfish motive to acquire, and relative deprivation held constant, females will have greater perceptions of greed because males tend to view competition and aggression as normal, whereas females do not. The second hypothesis is that because of the greater perceptions of greed, females will also have greater moral outrage and personal anger. The data that was supposed to be used to find results was lost due to computer failure. Therefore, no conclusions could be found, only hypothetical possibilities.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMehl, Matthiasen
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