Teacher and Peer Written Feedback in the ESL Composition Classroom: Appropriation, Stance, and Authorship

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/577518
Title:
Teacher and Peer Written Feedback in the ESL Composition Classroom: Appropriation, Stance, and Authorship
Author:
Fordham, Sonja K.
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
While studies have shown that teacher and peer feedback are beneficial to students, research has also found that teachers can appropriate students' texts in their feedback, taking away authorship in the process (Brannon & Knoblauch, 1982; Goldstein, 2004). The present study addressed the type of written feedback that I gave my ESL composition students and the type of feedback they gave each other during the writing process, and it examined their responses to the feedback they received. As the response stance taken when providing feedback is a determiner of the level of control the feedback conveys (Straub & Lunsford, 1995), I investigated the stances that both I and my students took while providing feedback. Since my goal had been to avoid text appropriation, I wanted to learn if I was successful in taking a less controlling stance in the feedback that I gave to my students. In addition, I wanted to discover whether the stance my students took while giving feedback would change over the course of the semester. Further, I used a consciousness-raising pedagogical tool — the Cover Sheet — to examine the responses of the students to the feedback to determine if they thought critically about the feedback they had received. At the end of the study, I discovered that my intention to only provide feedback that was not considered controlling was too idealistic and that at least for ESL students, it is easier to understand feedback if it is more direct. Additionally, I found that those students who had an easier time understanding the feedback I gave them and used it to revise their papers ended up getting a higher grade in the course.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
L2 writing; peer feedback; student response; teacher feedback; text appropriation; Second Language Acquisition & Teaching; ESL students
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Second Language Acquisition & Teaching
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Waugh, Linda R.
Committee Chair:
Waugh, Linda R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTeacher and Peer Written Feedback in the ESL Composition Classroom: Appropriation, Stance, and Authorshipen_US
dc.creatorFordham, Sonja K.en
dc.contributor.authorFordham, Sonja K.en
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractWhile studies have shown that teacher and peer feedback are beneficial to students, research has also found that teachers can appropriate students' texts in their feedback, taking away authorship in the process (Brannon & Knoblauch, 1982; Goldstein, 2004). The present study addressed the type of written feedback that I gave my ESL composition students and the type of feedback they gave each other during the writing process, and it examined their responses to the feedback they received. As the response stance taken when providing feedback is a determiner of the level of control the feedback conveys (Straub & Lunsford, 1995), I investigated the stances that both I and my students took while providing feedback. Since my goal had been to avoid text appropriation, I wanted to learn if I was successful in taking a less controlling stance in the feedback that I gave to my students. In addition, I wanted to discover whether the stance my students took while giving feedback would change over the course of the semester. Further, I used a consciousness-raising pedagogical tool — the Cover Sheet — to examine the responses of the students to the feedback to determine if they thought critically about the feedback they had received. At the end of the study, I discovered that my intention to only provide feedback that was not considered controlling was too idealistic and that at least for ESL students, it is easier to understand feedback if it is more direct. Additionally, I found that those students who had an easier time understanding the feedback I gave them and used it to revise their papers ended up getting a higher grade in the course.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectL2 writingen
dc.subjectpeer feedbacken
dc.subjectstudent responseen
dc.subjectteacher feedbacken
dc.subjecttext appropriationen
dc.subjectSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen
dc.subjectESL studentsen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWaugh, Linda R.en
dc.contributor.chairWaugh, Linda R.en
dc.contributor.committeememberWaugh, Linda R.en
dc.contributor.committeememberPanferov, Suzanne K.en
dc.contributor.committeememberTardy, Christine M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberWarner, Chantelle N.en
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