Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/566387
Title:
Geology of the Pima Mine, Pima County, Arizona
Author:
Himes, Marshall David, 1943-
Issue Date:
1972
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Pima mine, a 39,000 ton per day copper mine, is located 17 miles south of Tucson, Arizona. The mine is in a sequence of Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments striking east-northeast and dipping southeasterly intruded by Tertiary quartz monzonite porphyry. The Paleozoic Permian(?) dolomites, limestones, and sandstones have been altered to calc-silicate skarn, marble and quartzite. The overlying Mesozoic Triassic(?) clastic sediments have undergone some recrystallization and hydrothermal alteration. The clastic metasediments are divided into three distinct lithologic units: lithic arenite, arkose, and interbedded and overlying black argillite. Three types of hydrothermal alteration in the clastic rocks are propylitic alteration (eqidote, chlorite, and quartz, with or without sericite), quartz-sericite alteration, and potassic alteration (K-feldspar and quartz, with or without sericite and chlorite). The porphyry has undergone potassic alteration. Dominant structures are an east-west post mineral fault in teh western part of the pit, and strong low angle shearing and faulting which truncates the ore body at depth. Two joint sets, one parallel to bedding and the other at right angles to bedding are prominent in the mine. Faulting is in two dominant directions, one striking northwest, dipping northeast and the other striking northeast, dipping northwest. Mineralization is predominantly disseminated pyrite and chalcopyrite, and molybdenite-quartz veinlets. There are less important amounts of magnetite, hematite, sphalerite, galena, tennantite, and bornite. Mineralization is believed to be both structurally and chemically controlled.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Geology -- Arizona -- Pima Mine Region.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Geosciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleGeology of the Pima Mine, Pima County, Arizonaen
dc.creatorHimes, Marshall David, 1943-en
dc.contributor.authorHimes, Marshall David, 1943-en
dc.date.issued1972en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe Pima mine, a 39,000 ton per day copper mine, is located 17 miles south of Tucson, Arizona. The mine is in a sequence of Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments striking east-northeast and dipping southeasterly intruded by Tertiary quartz monzonite porphyry. The Paleozoic Permian(?) dolomites, limestones, and sandstones have been altered to calc-silicate skarn, marble and quartzite. The overlying Mesozoic Triassic(?) clastic sediments have undergone some recrystallization and hydrothermal alteration. The clastic metasediments are divided into three distinct lithologic units: lithic arenite, arkose, and interbedded and overlying black argillite. Three types of hydrothermal alteration in the clastic rocks are propylitic alteration (eqidote, chlorite, and quartz, with or without sericite), quartz-sericite alteration, and potassic alteration (K-feldspar and quartz, with or without sericite and chlorite). The porphyry has undergone potassic alteration. Dominant structures are an east-west post mineral fault in teh western part of the pit, and strong low angle shearing and faulting which truncates the ore body at depth. Two joint sets, one parallel to bedding and the other at right angles to bedding are prominent in the mine. Faulting is in two dominant directions, one striking northwest, dipping northeast and the other striking northeast, dipping northwest. Mineralization is predominantly disseminated pyrite and chalcopyrite, and molybdenite-quartz veinlets. There are less important amounts of magnetite, hematite, sphalerite, galena, tennantite, and bornite. Mineralization is believed to be both structurally and chemically controlled.en
dc.description.noteThis item was digitized from a paper original and/or a microfilm copy. If you need higher-resolution images for any content in this item, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en
dc.subjectGeology -- Arizona -- Pima Mine Region.en
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.oclc27827125en
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27382588en
dc.identifier.callnumberE9791 1972 81en
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.