Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/566259
Title:
Spanning the Continuum: From Single Cell to Collective Migration
Author:
Vig, Dhruv Kumar
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A cell's ability to sense and respond to mechanical signals highlights the significance of physical forces in biology; however, to date most biomedical research has focused on genetics and biochemical signaling. We sought to further understand the physical mechanisms that guide the cellular migrations that occur in a number of biological processes, such as tissue development and regeneration, bacterial infections and cancer metastasis. We investigated the migration of single cells and determined whether the biomechanics of these cells could be used to elucidate multi-cellular mechanisms. We first studied Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. We created a mathematical model based on the mechanical interactions between the flagella and cell body that explained the rotation and undulation of the cell body that occurs as the bacterium swims. This model further predicts how the swimming dynamics could be affected by alterations in flagellar or cell wall stiffnesses. Fitting the model to experimental data allowed us to calculate the flagellar torque and drag for Bb, and showed that Treponema pallidum (Tp), the syphilis pathogen, is biomechanically similar to Bb. Next, we used experimentally-determined parameters of Bb's motility to develop a population-level model that accounts for the morphology and spreading of the "bulls-eye" rash that is typically the first indicator of Lyme disease. This work supported clinical findings on the efficacy of antibiotic treatment regimes. Finally, we investigated the dynamics of epithelial monolayers. We found that intracellular contractile stress is the primary driving force behind collective dynamics in epithelial layers, a result previously predicted from a biophysical model. Taken together, these findings identify the relevance of physics in cellular migration and a role of mechanical signaling in biomedical science.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
collective migration; live-cell imaging; lyme disease; mathematical modeling; Molecular & Cellular Biology; cell motility
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Molecular & Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wolgemuth, Charles W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSpanning the Continuum: From Single Cell to Collective Migrationen_US
dc.creatorVig, Dhruv Kumaren
dc.contributor.authorVig, Dhruv Kumaren
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractA cell's ability to sense and respond to mechanical signals highlights the significance of physical forces in biology; however, to date most biomedical research has focused on genetics and biochemical signaling. We sought to further understand the physical mechanisms that guide the cellular migrations that occur in a number of biological processes, such as tissue development and regeneration, bacterial infections and cancer metastasis. We investigated the migration of single cells and determined whether the biomechanics of these cells could be used to elucidate multi-cellular mechanisms. We first studied Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. We created a mathematical model based on the mechanical interactions between the flagella and cell body that explained the rotation and undulation of the cell body that occurs as the bacterium swims. This model further predicts how the swimming dynamics could be affected by alterations in flagellar or cell wall stiffnesses. Fitting the model to experimental data allowed us to calculate the flagellar torque and drag for Bb, and showed that Treponema pallidum (Tp), the syphilis pathogen, is biomechanically similar to Bb. Next, we used experimentally-determined parameters of Bb's motility to develop a population-level model that accounts for the morphology and spreading of the "bulls-eye" rash that is typically the first indicator of Lyme disease. This work supported clinical findings on the efficacy of antibiotic treatment regimes. Finally, we investigated the dynamics of epithelial monolayers. We found that intracellular contractile stress is the primary driving force behind collective dynamics in epithelial layers, a result previously predicted from a biophysical model. Taken together, these findings identify the relevance of physics in cellular migration and a role of mechanical signaling in biomedical science.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectcollective migrationen
dc.subjectlive-cell imagingen
dc.subjectlyme diseaseen
dc.subjectmathematical modelingen
dc.subjectMolecular & Cellular Biologyen
dc.subjectcell motilityen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular & Cellular Biologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWolgemuth, Charles W.en
dc.contributor.committeememberWolgemuth, Charles W.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGutenkunst, Ryanen
dc.contributor.committeememberSecomb, Timothy W.en
dc.contributor.committeememberWeinert, Teden
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