Peer Victimization in College Sorority and Fraternity Students: The Impact of Group Identity and Campus Connectedness

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/565888
Title:
Peer Victimization in College Sorority and Fraternity Students: The Impact of Group Identity and Campus Connectedness
Author:
Michael, Julia Jacquelyn
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined peer victimization, specifically indirect peer victimization and cyber victimization, in a sample of 311 college fraternity and sorority students at a large, public university in the southwestern United States. Of specific focus was the relationship between peer victimization--both within fraternity and sorority groups and between fraternity and sorority groups and outside members--and co-occurring psychological stress (i.e., anxiety, depression, stress). The potential mediating roles of group identity and campus connectedness were also examined. This study utilized the social psychological theory of Social Identity Theory to predict the relationships between the aforementioned variables. Results indicated that a majority of college fraternity and sorority students (58%) have experienced at least one instance of indirect peer victimization since being initiated into their respective organization. Collectively, the majority of respondents reported low levels of peer victimization and high levels of group identity and campus connectedness. As hypothesized, peer victimization was significantly and positively correlated with stress. In addition, higher ratings of within-group peer victimization were related to lower ratings of group identity. However, ratings of between-group peer victimization were not significantly related to ratings of group identity, which did not support the hypothesis that there would be a significant and positive correlation between the two.It was also found that campus connectedness mediated the relationship between peer victimization and Stress. Specifically, campus connectedness served as a protective factor from stress. Alternately, group identity did not protect against stress. Lastly, a specific subgroup of participants was identified as experiencing significantly high levels of peer victimization. Participants designated as "Victims" were significantly more likely to report ethnic minority status, be male, and be a fifth-year college student. Moreover, these students reported significantly higher levels of stress, and lower levels of group identity and campus connectedness. The implications of these findings for university and educational settings are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
group identity; peer victimization; Social Identity Theory; School Psychology; campus connectedness
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; School Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sulkowski, Michael L.
Committee Chair:
Sulkowski, Michael L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePeer Victimization in College Sorority and Fraternity Students: The Impact of Group Identity and Campus Connectednessen_US
dc.creatorMichael, Julia Jacquelynen
dc.contributor.authorMichael, Julia Jacquelynen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis study examined peer victimization, specifically indirect peer victimization and cyber victimization, in a sample of 311 college fraternity and sorority students at a large, public university in the southwestern United States. Of specific focus was the relationship between peer victimization--both within fraternity and sorority groups and between fraternity and sorority groups and outside members--and co-occurring psychological stress (i.e., anxiety, depression, stress). The potential mediating roles of group identity and campus connectedness were also examined. This study utilized the social psychological theory of Social Identity Theory to predict the relationships between the aforementioned variables. Results indicated that a majority of college fraternity and sorority students (58%) have experienced at least one instance of indirect peer victimization since being initiated into their respective organization. Collectively, the majority of respondents reported low levels of peer victimization and high levels of group identity and campus connectedness. As hypothesized, peer victimization was significantly and positively correlated with stress. In addition, higher ratings of within-group peer victimization were related to lower ratings of group identity. However, ratings of between-group peer victimization were not significantly related to ratings of group identity, which did not support the hypothesis that there would be a significant and positive correlation between the two.It was also found that campus connectedness mediated the relationship between peer victimization and Stress. Specifically, campus connectedness served as a protective factor from stress. Alternately, group identity did not protect against stress. Lastly, a specific subgroup of participants was identified as experiencing significantly high levels of peer victimization. Participants designated as "Victims" were significantly more likely to report ethnic minority status, be male, and be a fifth-year college student. Moreover, these students reported significantly higher levels of stress, and lower levels of group identity and campus connectedness. The implications of these findings for university and educational settings are discussed.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectgroup identityen
dc.subjectpeer victimizationen
dc.subjectSocial Identity Theoryen
dc.subjectSchool Psychologyen
dc.subjectcampus connectednessen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool Psychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorSulkowski, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.chairSulkowski, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberSulkowski, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberEklund, Katie R.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMorris, Richard J.en
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