Teaching Culture In Arabic: Perspectives On The Use Of Blended Learning And Hypermedia

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/565886
Title:
Teaching Culture In Arabic: Perspectives On The Use Of Blended Learning And Hypermedia
Author:
Tamimi, Mohammed Husni Mohammed
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In contemporary foreign language pedagogy, effective teaching of intercultural communicative competence cannot be separated from the use of technology. Web 2.0, social media, mobile devices, online and blended learning, and wearing technology have made it nearly impossible to develop effective courses without basing them on the target culture. Teaching culture, however, is not salient in foreign language teaching; it is the most neglected part (Sercu, 2005) and culture has to defend its legitimacy to be integrated in teaching languages, just as Kramsch (1995) put it "...culture, in order to be legitimate, has always had to justify itself" (p. 85). As a result, teachers devote around 20% of their teaching time to teaching culture (Castro, Sercu & García, 2004). In recent years, nevertheless, there has been a shift in understanding, implementing and integrating teaching culture in foreign language settings (Bayyurt, 2006, Chamberlin-Quinlisk, 2012; Gonen & Aglam, 2012; Castro, et. al., 2004; Byram, 2002), but at a slow pace (Castro et al., 2004; Sercu, García, & Castro, 2005). The situation of teaching culture using technology in Arabic is not as advanced as for other foreign languages and the attempts to remedy the problems are limited. Although interest in learning Arabic has noticeably increased in the last twenty years, educational institutions are far from ready to absorb the new enrollments. The lack of the integration of culture and technology in the Arabic teaching context has led to conducting three interrelated studies in this dissertation which investigated: teaching culture in Arabic: Teachers' and learners perspectives; teaching culture in Arabic: learners' perspectives on blended learning setting; and teaching culture in Arabic: Learners' affect of Arabic Hypermedia. The results of the three studies showed that the teachers and the learners understand the important role that culture plays, but statistically significant differences exist between teachers' and learners' views of some of the aspects of culture teaching. The results also show that learners had positive feelings towards the blended setting and the Arabic Hypermedia. Finally, in a call for teaching language as culture using technology, the dissertation suggests practical pedagogical implications for teaching foreign language and Arabic language.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
blended; culture; foreign language; language; technology; Second Language Acquisition & Teaching; arabic
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Second Language Acquisition & Teaching
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ariew, Robert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTeaching Culture In Arabic: Perspectives On The Use Of Blended Learning And Hypermediaen_US
dc.creatorTamimi, Mohammed Husni Mohammeden
dc.contributor.authorTamimi, Mohammed Husni Mohammeden
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIn contemporary foreign language pedagogy, effective teaching of intercultural communicative competence cannot be separated from the use of technology. Web 2.0, social media, mobile devices, online and blended learning, and wearing technology have made it nearly impossible to develop effective courses without basing them on the target culture. Teaching culture, however, is not salient in foreign language teaching; it is the most neglected part (Sercu, 2005) and culture has to defend its legitimacy to be integrated in teaching languages, just as Kramsch (1995) put it "...culture, in order to be legitimate, has always had to justify itself" (p. 85). As a result, teachers devote around 20% of their teaching time to teaching culture (Castro, Sercu & García, 2004). In recent years, nevertheless, there has been a shift in understanding, implementing and integrating teaching culture in foreign language settings (Bayyurt, 2006, Chamberlin-Quinlisk, 2012; Gonen & Aglam, 2012; Castro, et. al., 2004; Byram, 2002), but at a slow pace (Castro et al., 2004; Sercu, García, & Castro, 2005). The situation of teaching culture using technology in Arabic is not as advanced as for other foreign languages and the attempts to remedy the problems are limited. Although interest in learning Arabic has noticeably increased in the last twenty years, educational institutions are far from ready to absorb the new enrollments. The lack of the integration of culture and technology in the Arabic teaching context has led to conducting three interrelated studies in this dissertation which investigated: teaching culture in Arabic: Teachers' and learners perspectives; teaching culture in Arabic: learners' perspectives on blended learning setting; and teaching culture in Arabic: Learners' affect of Arabic Hypermedia. The results of the three studies showed that the teachers and the learners understand the important role that culture plays, but statistically significant differences exist between teachers' and learners' views of some of the aspects of culture teaching. The results also show that learners had positive feelings towards the blended setting and the Arabic Hypermedia. Finally, in a call for teaching language as culture using technology, the dissertation suggests practical pedagogical implications for teaching foreign language and Arabic language.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectblendeden
dc.subjectcultureen
dc.subjectforeign languageen
dc.subjectlanguageen
dc.subjecttechnologyen
dc.subjectSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen
dc.subjectarabicen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorAriew, Roberten
dc.contributor.committeememberAriew, Roberten
dc.contributor.committeememberWaugh, Linda R.en
dc.contributor.committeememberShiri, Soniaen
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