Intended and Received Language Arts Curricula in a Standardized Era: Misalignments and Negotiations in Border Community Schools

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/565833
Title:
Intended and Received Language Arts Curricula in a Standardized Era: Misalignments and Negotiations in Border Community Schools
Author:
Molera, Joan Elizabeth
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is about curriculum and leadership in Arizona-Mexico border community schools. Specifically, I examine intended and received language arts curricula (i.e., what content is taught, to whom, and with what pedagogy) (Porter, 2004), the misalignments between these curriculum types, and the misalignments in leadership approaches in border community schools. My dissertation draws on both classic and critical curriculum leadership studies (e.g., Hallinger, 2008; Johnson, 2006) with an emphasis on Funds of Knowledge (e.g., Moll, Amanti, Neff, & Gonzalez, 1992), cultural capital (e.g., Yosso, 2005), and habitus (e.g., Bourdieu & Passeron, 1990). I utilize ethnographic and phenomenological approaches to my study of four elementary and three middle schools located in two Arizona-Mexico border communities 120 miles apart from each other. Findings suggest that children living in border communities exhibit cultural capital (Yosso, 2005) and Funds of Knowledge (Moll et al., 1992), but these strengths are not considered in the intended curricula. Participants see the culture of the border and the culture of the school as two very separate constructs, particularly in relation to curriculum. The children in the study consider this reality commonsensical. Culturally responsive curriculum leaders, though positioned to change the status quo, are compliant and helpless against the dominant standardized regime. External forces silence everything these leaders know about research and practice. My dissertation concludes with implications for research, practice, and policy to blend culturally responsive structures, pedagogy, and behaviors to the standardization movement.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
classic leadership; critical leadership; cultural capital; Funds of Knowledge; standardization; Educational Leadership; border community
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Leadership
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ylimaki, Rose

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleIntended and Received Language Arts Curricula in a Standardized Era: Misalignments and Negotiations in Border Community Schoolsen_US
dc.creatorMolera, Joan Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorMolera, Joan Elizabethen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is about curriculum and leadership in Arizona-Mexico border community schools. Specifically, I examine intended and received language arts curricula (i.e., what content is taught, to whom, and with what pedagogy) (Porter, 2004), the misalignments between these curriculum types, and the misalignments in leadership approaches in border community schools. My dissertation draws on both classic and critical curriculum leadership studies (e.g., Hallinger, 2008; Johnson, 2006) with an emphasis on Funds of Knowledge (e.g., Moll, Amanti, Neff, & Gonzalez, 1992), cultural capital (e.g., Yosso, 2005), and habitus (e.g., Bourdieu & Passeron, 1990). I utilize ethnographic and phenomenological approaches to my study of four elementary and three middle schools located in two Arizona-Mexico border communities 120 miles apart from each other. Findings suggest that children living in border communities exhibit cultural capital (Yosso, 2005) and Funds of Knowledge (Moll et al., 1992), but these strengths are not considered in the intended curricula. Participants see the culture of the border and the culture of the school as two very separate constructs, particularly in relation to curriculum. The children in the study consider this reality commonsensical. Culturally responsive curriculum leaders, though positioned to change the status quo, are compliant and helpless against the dominant standardized regime. External forces silence everything these leaders know about research and practice. My dissertation concludes with implications for research, practice, and policy to blend culturally responsive structures, pedagogy, and behaviors to the standardization movement.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectclassic leadershipen
dc.subjectcritical leadershipen
dc.subjectcultural capitalen
dc.subjectFunds of Knowledgeen
dc.subjectstandardizationen
dc.subjectEducational Leadershipen
dc.subjectborder communityen
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadershipen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorYlimaki, Roseen
dc.contributor.committeememberYlimaki, Roseen
dc.contributor.committeememberBennett, Jeffen
dc.contributor.committeememberDoyle, Walteren
dc.contributor.committeememberKoyama, Jillen
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