Embracing Moral Luck: Accidents, Apologies, and the Foundations of Social Cooperation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/560948
Title:
Embracing Moral Luck: Accidents, Apologies, and the Foundations of Social Cooperation
Author:
Hankins, Keith
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 22-Jun-2017
Abstract:
The norms that mediate our responses to accidents play a critical role in facilitating social cooperation. My dissertation explores these norms with an eye towards what they can tell us about the nature of moral responsibility. Drawing on Adam Smith's brief, but important discussion of moral luck, I argue that our responses to accidents reveal the extent to which the obligations we incur and the moral appraisals we make of one another are often appropriately influenced by fortune. In particular, I show how making sense of these responses requires us to embrace the idea that we can sometimes be morally responsible for things without being culpable, and I argue that doing so need not do violence to our moral intuitions.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Apologies; Luck; Moral Responsibility; Philosophy; Adam Smith
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Philosophy
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Schmidtz, David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEmbracing Moral Luck: Accidents, Apologies, and the Foundations of Social Cooperationen_US
dc.creatorHankins, Keithen
dc.contributor.authorHankins, Keithen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.releaseRelease after 22-Jun-2017en
dc.description.abstractThe norms that mediate our responses to accidents play a critical role in facilitating social cooperation. My dissertation explores these norms with an eye towards what they can tell us about the nature of moral responsibility. Drawing on Adam Smith's brief, but important discussion of moral luck, I argue that our responses to accidents reveal the extent to which the obligations we incur and the moral appraisals we make of one another are often appropriately influenced by fortune. In particular, I show how making sense of these responses requires us to embrace the idea that we can sometimes be morally responsible for things without being culpable, and I argue that doing so need not do violence to our moral intuitions.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectApologiesen
dc.subjectLucken
dc.subjectMoral Responsibilityen
dc.subjectPhilosophyen
dc.subjectAdam Smithen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorSchmidtz, Daviden
dc.contributor.committeememberGill, Michaelen
dc.contributor.committeememberMcKenna, Michaelen
dc.contributor.committeememberNichols, Shaunen
dc.contributor.committeememberSchmidtz, Daviden
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