Electrifying Mexico: Cultural Responses to a New Technology, 1880s-1960s

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/560857
Title:
Electrifying Mexico: Cultural Responses to a New Technology, 1880s-1960s
Author:
Montaño García, Diana Jeaneth
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 25-Dec-2015
Abstract:
Electricity played a central role in imagining and crafting Mexico's path to modernity from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries. Since the late 19th century, Mexican officials pursued the goals of order and progress, enrolling science and technology to help rationalize and modernize the nation, its economy, and society. The electrification of the country's capital was seen as a crucial step in bringing it to the level of modern European and American cities. Electricity as a primary engine of modern society permeated all aspects of life traversing histories of the city, transportation, labor, business, engineering, women, agriculture, medicine, death, public celebrations, nightlife, advertising, literature, architecture, to name a few. Taking technology as an extension of human lives, I argue that in their everyday life, in public and private spaces, government officials, technocrats, lawyers, doctors, business owners, housewives and ordinary citizens both sold and consumed electricity. They did so by crafting a discourse for an electrified future; and by shaping how the new technology was to be used. I examine newspapers, cookbooks, novels, women's magazines, traveler's accounts, memoirs, poems, songs, court, government and company records to show how by debating, embracing, rejecting, appropriating and transforming this technology, Mexicans actively shaped their country's quest for modernity.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
History
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Beezley, William H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleElectrifying Mexico: Cultural Responses to a New Technology, 1880s-1960sen_US
dc.creatorMontaño García, Diana Jeanethen
dc.contributor.authorMontaño García, Diana Jeanethen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.releaseRelease after 25-Dec-2015en
dc.description.abstractElectricity played a central role in imagining and crafting Mexico's path to modernity from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries. Since the late 19th century, Mexican officials pursued the goals of order and progress, enrolling science and technology to help rationalize and modernize the nation, its economy, and society. The electrification of the country's capital was seen as a crucial step in bringing it to the level of modern European and American cities. Electricity as a primary engine of modern society permeated all aspects of life traversing histories of the city, transportation, labor, business, engineering, women, agriculture, medicine, death, public celebrations, nightlife, advertising, literature, architecture, to name a few. Taking technology as an extension of human lives, I argue that in their everyday life, in public and private spaces, government officials, technocrats, lawyers, doctors, business owners, housewives and ordinary citizens both sold and consumed electricity. They did so by crafting a discourse for an electrified future; and by shaping how the new technology was to be used. I examine newspapers, cookbooks, novels, women's magazines, traveler's accounts, memoirs, poems, songs, court, government and company records to show how by debating, embracing, rejecting, appropriating and transforming this technology, Mexicans actively shaped their country's quest for modernity.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectHistoryen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBeezley, William H.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGosner, Kevinen
dc.contributor.committeememberBarickman, Bert J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBeezley, William H.en
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