What We Don't Tell; We Write: Messages for Black Girls in African Diaspora Young Adult Novels

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/560808
Title:
What We Don't Tell; We Write: Messages for Black Girls in African Diaspora Young Adult Novels
Author:
Cueto, Desireé W.
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation offered a close reading of African diaspora young adult novels, written by African American, Afro-Caribbean and black African women. The four novels selected for this analysis - Coe Booth's (2010) Kendra, Nana Ekua Brew-Hammond's (2010) Powder Necklace, Lynn Joseph's (2010) Flowers in the Sky and Adwoa Badoe's (2010) Between Sisters - represented the life circumstances, concerns and issues facing black adolescent girls of this generation. Set in Ghana, the United States, the Dominican Republic and England, the novels collectively provided a compelling site to examine thematic parallels as well as points of departure in each author's representation of black female adolescent identity development. Given this focus, the study employed a methodology of critical content analysis, relying on theoretical arguments from black feminism, postcolonial studies, and a youth lens. The three theories were brought into dialogue with one another in order to examine how multiple social constructions, including age, interacted and overlapped in the lives of each of the protagonists. Findings revealed that age, and concomitantly race, class and gender significantly influenced the protagonists' sense of subjectivity and selfhood. Across the text set, the significance of age was brought into light through a dramatic shift in the protagonists' relationships with their mothers or mother figures. Specifically, it was the onset of sexual maturity that fueled a multiplying of oppressive experiences for each of the protagonists within her home. By attending to the ways in which the protagonists grappled with such experiences, the researcher uncovered new models for solidifying black female adolescent identity.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Diaspora; Young Adult; Language, Reading & Culture; African
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading & Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Short, Kathy G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleWhat We Don't Tell; We Write: Messages for Black Girls in African Diaspora Young Adult Novelsen_US
dc.creatorCueto, Desireé W.en
dc.contributor.authorCueto, Desireé W.en
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation offered a close reading of African diaspora young adult novels, written by African American, Afro-Caribbean and black African women. The four novels selected for this analysis - Coe Booth's (2010) Kendra, Nana Ekua Brew-Hammond's (2010) Powder Necklace, Lynn Joseph's (2010) Flowers in the Sky and Adwoa Badoe's (2010) Between Sisters - represented the life circumstances, concerns and issues facing black adolescent girls of this generation. Set in Ghana, the United States, the Dominican Republic and England, the novels collectively provided a compelling site to examine thematic parallels as well as points of departure in each author's representation of black female adolescent identity development. Given this focus, the study employed a methodology of critical content analysis, relying on theoretical arguments from black feminism, postcolonial studies, and a youth lens. The three theories were brought into dialogue with one another in order to examine how multiple social constructions, including age, interacted and overlapped in the lives of each of the protagonists. Findings revealed that age, and concomitantly race, class and gender significantly influenced the protagonists' sense of subjectivity and selfhood. Across the text set, the significance of age was brought into light through a dramatic shift in the protagonists' relationships with their mothers or mother figures. Specifically, it was the onset of sexual maturity that fueled a multiplying of oppressive experiences for each of the protagonists within her home. By attending to the ways in which the protagonists grappled with such experiences, the researcher uncovered new models for solidifying black female adolescent identity.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectDiasporaen
dc.subjectYoung Adulten
dc.subjectLanguage, Reading & Cultureen
dc.subjectAfricanen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorShort, Kathy G.en
dc.contributor.committeememberCammarota, Julioen
dc.contributor.committeememberBrooks, Wandaen
dc.contributor.committeememberBrochin, Carolen
dc.contributor.committeememberShort, Kathy G.en
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