Implementation of a Depression Screening Program in Long-Term Care

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/560806
Title:
Implementation of a Depression Screening Program in Long-Term Care
Author:
Tanner, Brooke
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this project was to implement a screening program that would identify older adults with depressive symptoms. Data Sources: The Mini Mental Status Exam (MMSE) is a baseline cognitive screen used to identify which depression screening tool should be used for the patient. The Geriatric Depression Scale-15 is used to screen patients with a MMSE score of 19 or higher. The Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia is used for patients with a MMSE of 18 or below. Conclusions: This project had a small, convenience sample size (n=17). All (n=17) patients were given the cognitive screening. Due to inability to obtain consent, only 70% (n=12) were screened for depression. All 17 patients shared a total of five providers, who were contacted on two different occasions to notify them of the screening results and asked to complete the six-item survey. Two providers responded to the notification and completed the survey. Providers who completed the Likert survey strongly agreed that the depression treatment and tracking (DTT) form: (1) was helpful in documenting depression in the long-term care patients, (2) was easy to use, (3) decreased time spent per patient visit, and (4) was the one they would like to see used in the facility. Implications for Practice: Implementing a depression screening program through the use of a depression treatment and tracking form will assist staff with ease of documenting and communicating screening results to the patient’s primary care provider. The DTT form supports improved health outcomes for the long-term care patients by giving primary care providers a quick and easy-to-use form they can evaluate to determine if further evaluation and treatment is needed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Long-Term Care; Older Adults; Nursing; Depression
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Badger, Terry A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleImplementation of a Depression Screening Program in Long-Term Careen_US
dc.creatorTanner, Brookeen
dc.contributor.authorTanner, Brookeen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this project was to implement a screening program that would identify older adults with depressive symptoms. Data Sources: The Mini Mental Status Exam (MMSE) is a baseline cognitive screen used to identify which depression screening tool should be used for the patient. The Geriatric Depression Scale-15 is used to screen patients with a MMSE score of 19 or higher. The Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia is used for patients with a MMSE of 18 or below. Conclusions: This project had a small, convenience sample size (n=17). All (n=17) patients were given the cognitive screening. Due to inability to obtain consent, only 70% (n=12) were screened for depression. All 17 patients shared a total of five providers, who were contacted on two different occasions to notify them of the screening results and asked to complete the six-item survey. Two providers responded to the notification and completed the survey. Providers who completed the Likert survey strongly agreed that the depression treatment and tracking (DTT) form: (1) was helpful in documenting depression in the long-term care patients, (2) was easy to use, (3) decreased time spent per patient visit, and (4) was the one they would like to see used in the facility. Implications for Practice: Implementing a depression screening program through the use of a depression treatment and tracking form will assist staff with ease of documenting and communicating screening results to the patient’s primary care provider. The DTT form supports improved health outcomes for the long-term care patients by giving primary care providers a quick and easy-to-use form they can evaluate to determine if further evaluation and treatment is needed.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectLong-Term Careen
dc.subjectOlder Adultsen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectDepressionen
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBadger, Terry A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberRigney, Ted S.en
dc.contributor.committeememberInsel, Kathleen C.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBadger, Terry A.en
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