A Systems Perspective on Mental Wellbeing and Quality of Life: Testing a Model of Dietary Behavior, Physical Condition and Inflammation on Quality of Life in a Nationally Representative Dataset

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/560750
Title:
A Systems Perspective on Mental Wellbeing and Quality of Life: Testing a Model of Dietary Behavior, Physical Condition and Inflammation on Quality of Life in a Nationally Representative Dataset
Author:
Janssen, Clemens Walter
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The current dissertation tested a model based on a systems perspective, where inflammation was hypothesized to mediate the influence of diet and physical condition on quality of life (base model) in a nationally representative U.S. dataset (NHANES). Three additional hypotheses, regarding social support (The Buffering Hypothesis), early microbial exposure (The Hygiene Hypothesis) and life history theory (The Tradeoff Hypothesis) were tested utilizing the base model. All analysis utilized a structural equation model. This study focused on objective measurements for dietary behavior and physical activity utilizing blood serum values of nutrients and metabolic markers and anthropometric data as well as blood serum concentrations of CRP and white blood cell count. Quality of life was assessed with the number of limitations in daily living, the number of days that were affected by mental, emotional and physical limitations and the self-reported general health condition. The hypothesized model fit well to the data and the results revealed that lower intake of healthy nutrients and reduced physical condition both predicted decreased quality of life, as mediated by inflammation and explained 31.9 % of the variation in quality of life (R² = .319, p<.001). Social support further predicted quality of life directly (β = .417, p<.001) and indirectly through dietary behavior and inflammation (β = -.106, p<.001), microbial exposure significantly moderated the relation between inflammation and quality of life (β = -.127, p<.001) and higher reproductive effort predicted lower intake of vital nutrients (β = .316, p<.001), physical condition (β = .352, p<.001) and subsequent inflammation. Reproductive effort also directly predicted reduced quality of life (β = .278, p<.001). These analyses indicated that inflammation can be considered a strong mediator between lifestyle factors and resulting quality of life and that social support, microbial exposure and reproductive effort each added unique predictive value to this model.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Mental Wellbeing; Nutrition; Prevention; Psychoneuroimmunology; Quality of Life; Family & Consumer Sciences; Hygiene Hypothesis
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family & Consumer Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Raison, Charles L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleA Systems Perspective on Mental Wellbeing and Quality of Life: Testing a Model of Dietary Behavior, Physical Condition and Inflammation on Quality of Life in a Nationally Representative Dataseten_US
dc.creatorJanssen, Clemens Walteren
dc.contributor.authorJanssen, Clemens Walteren
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe current dissertation tested a model based on a systems perspective, where inflammation was hypothesized to mediate the influence of diet and physical condition on quality of life (base model) in a nationally representative U.S. dataset (NHANES). Three additional hypotheses, regarding social support (The Buffering Hypothesis), early microbial exposure (The Hygiene Hypothesis) and life history theory (The Tradeoff Hypothesis) were tested utilizing the base model. All analysis utilized a structural equation model. This study focused on objective measurements for dietary behavior and physical activity utilizing blood serum values of nutrients and metabolic markers and anthropometric data as well as blood serum concentrations of CRP and white blood cell count. Quality of life was assessed with the number of limitations in daily living, the number of days that were affected by mental, emotional and physical limitations and the self-reported general health condition. The hypothesized model fit well to the data and the results revealed that lower intake of healthy nutrients and reduced physical condition both predicted decreased quality of life, as mediated by inflammation and explained 31.9 % of the variation in quality of life (R² = .319, p<.001). Social support further predicted quality of life directly (β = .417, p<.001) and indirectly through dietary behavior and inflammation (β = -.106, p<.001), microbial exposure significantly moderated the relation between inflammation and quality of life (β = -.127, p<.001) and higher reproductive effort predicted lower intake of vital nutrients (β = .316, p<.001), physical condition (β = .352, p<.001) and subsequent inflammation. Reproductive effort also directly predicted reduced quality of life (β = .278, p<.001). These analyses indicated that inflammation can be considered a strong mediator between lifestyle factors and resulting quality of life and that social support, microbial exposure and reproductive effort each added unique predictive value to this model.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectMental Wellbeingen
dc.subjectNutritionen
dc.subjectPreventionen
dc.subjectPsychoneuroimmunologyen
dc.subjectQuality of Lifeen
dc.subjectFamily & Consumer Sciencesen
dc.subjectHygiene Hypothesisen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily & Consumer Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorRaison, Charles L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberAllen, John J. B.en
dc.contributor.committeememberWahl, Richarden
dc.contributor.committeememberSteklis, Horst Dieteren
dc.contributor.committeememberRaison, Charles L.en
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