Assessing Service Needs For Foster Children Automatically Enrolled Into Behavioral Health Services At Time Of Removal

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/556953
Title:
Assessing Service Needs For Foster Children Automatically Enrolled Into Behavioral Health Services At Time Of Removal
Author:
Edwinson, Roxanne Michelle
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study had an overarching objective of seeking information to better understand the service needs of children entering foster care who are universally enrolled into behavioral health services at the time of their home removal. The first specific aim was to examine how various case attributes (i.e., aspects of a child’s background, personal and familial characteristics, and CPS involvement) related to behavioral health needs at entry, represented by global functioning ratings and service intensity scores. A second specific aim was to explore the existence of natural groupings of foster youth to examine if meaningful groupings occur in relation to demographic and risk and factors. Finally, this study sought to evaluate service needs of subgroups of foster children who are typically under-referred for services. Data were collected from records of 327 school-age youth who were automatically enrolled into treatment from one community-based outpatient behavioral health provider at the time of home removal. The results of this study showed that the average school-age child entering foster care is performing in the at-risk range of global functioning (mean CGAS score of 69.23) and requires at least short-term behavioral health intervention services and/or recovery monitoring (mean CASII Composite Score of 13.1). With respect to severity of impaired functioning, the results indicated that racial background, medical history, speech problems, school grade level (e.g., <1 year, K-3,...9-12), psychological stability, and reasons for removal significantly contributed to scores of global functioning. With regard to the intensity of service needs, the findings suggested gender, historical involvement with child welfare services, foster placement, simultaneous removal of all children, history of sexualized behaviors, and global functioning predicted level of care composite scores. Subgroups of foster youth that are typically under-referred and/or under-utilize services (i.e., preschool age children, children who did not experience physical or sexual abuse, and ethnic minorities) generally did not differ in terms of functionality or service intensity ratings from their counterpart groups; the only exception being that Caucasian/Non-Hispanic youth demonstrated lower average ratings on global functioning than children who identify with other racial backgrounds. The data showed inadequate fit for examining latent classes among youth entering foster care.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
foster care; functioning; level of care; maltreatment; service needs; School Psychology; children
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; School Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Perfect, Michelle
Committee Chair:
Perfect, Michelle

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAssessing Service Needs For Foster Children Automatically Enrolled Into Behavioral Health Services At Time Of Removalen_US
dc.creatorEdwinson, Roxanne Michelleen
dc.contributor.authorEdwinson, Roxanne Michelleen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe present study had an overarching objective of seeking information to better understand the service needs of children entering foster care who are universally enrolled into behavioral health services at the time of their home removal. The first specific aim was to examine how various case attributes (i.e., aspects of a child’s background, personal and familial characteristics, and CPS involvement) related to behavioral health needs at entry, represented by global functioning ratings and service intensity scores. A second specific aim was to explore the existence of natural groupings of foster youth to examine if meaningful groupings occur in relation to demographic and risk and factors. Finally, this study sought to evaluate service needs of subgroups of foster children who are typically under-referred for services. Data were collected from records of 327 school-age youth who were automatically enrolled into treatment from one community-based outpatient behavioral health provider at the time of home removal. The results of this study showed that the average school-age child entering foster care is performing in the at-risk range of global functioning (mean CGAS score of 69.23) and requires at least short-term behavioral health intervention services and/or recovery monitoring (mean CASII Composite Score of 13.1). With respect to severity of impaired functioning, the results indicated that racial background, medical history, speech problems, school grade level (e.g., <1 year, K-3,...9-12), psychological stability, and reasons for removal significantly contributed to scores of global functioning. With regard to the intensity of service needs, the findings suggested gender, historical involvement with child welfare services, foster placement, simultaneous removal of all children, history of sexualized behaviors, and global functioning predicted level of care composite scores. Subgroups of foster youth that are typically under-referred and/or under-utilize services (i.e., preschool age children, children who did not experience physical or sexual abuse, and ethnic minorities) generally did not differ in terms of functionality or service intensity ratings from their counterpart groups; the only exception being that Caucasian/Non-Hispanic youth demonstrated lower average ratings on global functioning than children who identify with other racial backgrounds. The data showed inadequate fit for examining latent classes among youth entering foster care.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectfoster careen
dc.subjectfunctioningen
dc.subjectlevel of careen
dc.subjectmaltreatmenten
dc.subjectservice needsen
dc.subjectSchool Psychologyen
dc.subjectchildrenen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool Psychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorPerfect, Michelleen
dc.contributor.chairPerfect, Michelleen
dc.contributor.committeememberPerfect, Michelleen
dc.contributor.committeememberMorris, Richarden
dc.contributor.committeememberSummers, Jessicaen
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