A Corpus Approach to Ecological Discourse Analysis and L2 Writing Pedagogy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/556857
Title:
A Corpus Approach to Ecological Discourse Analysis and L2 Writing Pedagogy
Author:
Poole, Robert
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 4-May-2017
Abstract:
This three-article dissertation emerges from interests in corpus linguistics (CL), corpus-based discourse analysis, and corpus-informed pedagogy for second language (L2) writing classrooms. A brief summary of each article follows: Article #1: Using the localized, place-based discourse of the Rosemont Copper Mine debate of southern Arizona, the first article produces a corpus-based discourse analysis of texts from the primary interest groups involved in the mine proposal. The ecolinguistic analysis details linguistic patterns within the interest groups' texts and discusses how these grammatical and semantic features form rhetorical constellations, i.e. patterns of linguistic features performing a shared rhetorical purpose, within the debate. Findings show that the industry group produces rhetoric of authority, certainty, and dominion through deployment of particular constellations of lexicogrammatical features while the linguistic elements in the environmental advocacy texts construe uncertainty, doubt, aesthetic value, and environmental stewardship. Article #2: The second article details an integration of geographical information system (GIS) and CL techniques with an ecolinguistics-informed analytical framework for the analysis of the same contentious environmental debate from southern Arizona. The application of GIS and CL procedures enabled the mapping of place name mentions present within two interest group corpora as well as the frequency of particular semantic tags and semantic tag sets that co-occur with specific places prominent in the debate. The findings and the GIS visualizations exhibit how different interest groups refer to and represent geographical places within their discourse and how these references to places index ideological positions towards the environment. Article #3: The final article details a study in which twenty-one international students in the second course of an undergraduate writing program sequence at a U.S. university studied the local debate regarding the Rosemont Copper Mine. The participants analyzed texts from two primary interest groups, a local, environmental group and an international mining company, and participated in a series of corpus-aided activities using corpus data derived from texts from the opposing groups. The contrastive analyses made possible through the study of texts and corpus data from the two sharply distinct groups enabled students to notice, analyze, and discuss the meaningful and purposeful variation in word choice and rhetorical strategies present in the texts, the data, and the debate. The article provides a model for how corpus data can be integrated into writing classrooms for advancing students' abilities to analyze language and increase rhetorical awareness. The introductory chapter provides an overview of the Rosemont Copper Mine debate, ecolinguistics, and corpus linguistics. This opening chapter is followed by three articles (corresponding to Chapters 2, 3, and 4), and the dissertation concludes with a discussion of implications of the findings and potential for future research.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
corpus linguistics; ecological discourse analysis; L2 writing; Second Language Acquisition & Teaching; corpus-aided pedagogy
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Second Language Acquisition & Teaching
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reinhardt, Jonathon

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleA Corpus Approach to Ecological Discourse Analysis and L2 Writing Pedagogyen_US
dc.creatorPoole, Roberten
dc.contributor.authorPoole, Roberten
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.releaseRelease after 4-May-2017en
dc.description.abstractThis three-article dissertation emerges from interests in corpus linguistics (CL), corpus-based discourse analysis, and corpus-informed pedagogy for second language (L2) writing classrooms. A brief summary of each article follows: Article #1: Using the localized, place-based discourse of the Rosemont Copper Mine debate of southern Arizona, the first article produces a corpus-based discourse analysis of texts from the primary interest groups involved in the mine proposal. The ecolinguistic analysis details linguistic patterns within the interest groups' texts and discusses how these grammatical and semantic features form rhetorical constellations, i.e. patterns of linguistic features performing a shared rhetorical purpose, within the debate. Findings show that the industry group produces rhetoric of authority, certainty, and dominion through deployment of particular constellations of lexicogrammatical features while the linguistic elements in the environmental advocacy texts construe uncertainty, doubt, aesthetic value, and environmental stewardship. Article #2: The second article details an integration of geographical information system (GIS) and CL techniques with an ecolinguistics-informed analytical framework for the analysis of the same contentious environmental debate from southern Arizona. The application of GIS and CL procedures enabled the mapping of place name mentions present within two interest group corpora as well as the frequency of particular semantic tags and semantic tag sets that co-occur with specific places prominent in the debate. The findings and the GIS visualizations exhibit how different interest groups refer to and represent geographical places within their discourse and how these references to places index ideological positions towards the environment. Article #3: The final article details a study in which twenty-one international students in the second course of an undergraduate writing program sequence at a U.S. university studied the local debate regarding the Rosemont Copper Mine. The participants analyzed texts from two primary interest groups, a local, environmental group and an international mining company, and participated in a series of corpus-aided activities using corpus data derived from texts from the opposing groups. The contrastive analyses made possible through the study of texts and corpus data from the two sharply distinct groups enabled students to notice, analyze, and discuss the meaningful and purposeful variation in word choice and rhetorical strategies present in the texts, the data, and the debate. The article provides a model for how corpus data can be integrated into writing classrooms for advancing students' abilities to analyze language and increase rhetorical awareness. The introductory chapter provides an overview of the Rosemont Copper Mine debate, ecolinguistics, and corpus linguistics. This opening chapter is followed by three articles (corresponding to Chapters 2, 3, and 4), and the dissertation concludes with a discussion of implications of the findings and potential for future research.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectcorpus linguisticsen
dc.subjectecological discourse analysisen
dc.subjectL2 writingen
dc.subjectSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen
dc.subjectcorpus-aided pedagogyen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorReinhardt, Jonathonen
dc.contributor.committeememberTardy, Christineen
dc.contributor.committeememberWaugh, Lindaen
dc.contributor.committeememberReinhardt, Jonathonen
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