Critical Lattice: The Coalitional Practices and Potentialities of the Tucson Youth Poetry Slam

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/556838
Title:
Critical Lattice: The Coalitional Practices and Potentialities of the Tucson Youth Poetry Slam
Author:
Fields, Amanda
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this dissertation, I use ethnographic observations, interviews, personal narrative, and analysis of youth slam poetry in conversation with theories of identification to demonstrate how members of the Tucson Youth Poetry Slam (TYPS) perform, inhabit, and develop a consciousness indicative of coalition and critical inquiry. TYPS poets demonstrate evidence of what I propose as critical latticework, an image and heuristic that brings together identificatory screen-work with rhizomatic and intersectional perspectives on growth and development. Through my analyses of poetry, interviews, and the activities of this youth slam community, I aim to illustrate the value of critical latticework as a perspective that can contribute to altering our perceptions of youth as developing in one direction, with one sense of healthy progression to adulthood. A critical lattice is another way of perceiving the activities of identification that take place in in-between-and-through-spaces, as well as the potential activism and labor occurring in those spaces, which act as more than screens but spaces of growth and significant chaos. I argue that an understanding of critical latticework is transferrable to writing classrooms, offering a practical image with which students of writing can imagine and move with fluidity to generate meaningful discourse and expand their perspectives on identity and writing.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
identification; intersectionality; rhetoric; slam poetry; youth; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; community literacy
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Miller, Thomas P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCritical Lattice: The Coalitional Practices and Potentialities of the Tucson Youth Poetry Slamen_US
dc.creatorFields, Amandaen
dc.contributor.authorFields, Amandaen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, I use ethnographic observations, interviews, personal narrative, and analysis of youth slam poetry in conversation with theories of identification to demonstrate how members of the Tucson Youth Poetry Slam (TYPS) perform, inhabit, and develop a consciousness indicative of coalition and critical inquiry. TYPS poets demonstrate evidence of what I propose as critical latticework, an image and heuristic that brings together identificatory screen-work with rhizomatic and intersectional perspectives on growth and development. Through my analyses of poetry, interviews, and the activities of this youth slam community, I aim to illustrate the value of critical latticework as a perspective that can contribute to altering our perceptions of youth as developing in one direction, with one sense of healthy progression to adulthood. A critical lattice is another way of perceiving the activities of identification that take place in in-between-and-through-spaces, as well as the potential activism and labor occurring in those spaces, which act as more than screens but spaces of growth and significant chaos. I argue that an understanding of critical latticework is transferrable to writing classrooms, offering a practical image with which students of writing can imagine and move with fluidity to generate meaningful discourse and expand their perspectives on identity and writing.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectidentificationen
dc.subjectintersectionalityen
dc.subjectrhetoricen
dc.subjectslam poetryen
dc.subjectyouthen
dc.subjectRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen
dc.subjectcommunity literacyen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Thomas P.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Thomas P.en
dc.contributor.committeememberDeJoy, Nancy C.en
dc.contributor.committeememberLicona, Adela C.en
dc.contributor.committeememberRussell, Stephen T.en
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