Eyeing Alameda Park: Topographies of Culture, Class, and Cleanliness in Bourbon Mexico City, 1700 - 1800

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/556702
Title:
Eyeing Alameda Park: Topographies of Culture, Class, and Cleanliness in Bourbon Mexico City, 1700 - 1800
Author:
Hamman, Amy Cathleen
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study addresses eighteenth-century illustrations of Mexico City's Alameda Park. The study reads views of Alameda Park for information about the cultural, political, and economic topographies of the colonial city. Alameda Park offered a place of leisure that was free and open to all members of society. It is argued that as a popular, public setting the Alameda represented a discursive space where cultural opinions were shaped. These beliefs found expression in physical objects: views of Alameda Park. Despite the informational value of these expressions, views of Alameda Park remain an untapped resource on account of the ambiguity surrounding their classification as either an objective map or an artful landscape. This study takes a visual culture approach; it calls attention to the ways views of Alameda Park utilize the conventions of both map and landscape. The study analyzes four views of the park. Each view illustrates a moment in colonial history. These include: the 1719 founding of a convent for Amerindian women—the first in two hundred years of colonial rule, the 1774 opening of the Hospicio de Pobres—a facility that incarcerated vagrants in order to rehabilitate them, the circa 1775 renovation of Alameda Park—a project joining citywide efforts to better police the population, and the 1778 promulgation of the Royal Pragmatic on Marriages—a bill designed to preserve Spanish hegemony in a racially-diverse context. Each view speaks a separate narrative; by reading the object, audiences gain detailed information about the shifting cultural landscape of eighteenth-century Mexico City.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Class; Race; Mexico City; Sanitation; Vision; History & Theory of Art; Alameda Park
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History & Theory of Art
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Widdifield, Stacie G.
Committee Chair:
Widdifield, Stacie G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEyeing Alameda Park: Topographies of Culture, Class, and Cleanliness in Bourbon Mexico City, 1700 - 1800en_US
dc.creatorHamman, Amy Cathleenen
dc.contributor.authorHamman, Amy Cathleenen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis study addresses eighteenth-century illustrations of Mexico City's Alameda Park. The study reads views of Alameda Park for information about the cultural, political, and economic topographies of the colonial city. Alameda Park offered a place of leisure that was free and open to all members of society. It is argued that as a popular, public setting the Alameda represented a discursive space where cultural opinions were shaped. These beliefs found expression in physical objects: views of Alameda Park. Despite the informational value of these expressions, views of Alameda Park remain an untapped resource on account of the ambiguity surrounding their classification as either an objective map or an artful landscape. This study takes a visual culture approach; it calls attention to the ways views of Alameda Park utilize the conventions of both map and landscape. The study analyzes four views of the park. Each view illustrates a moment in colonial history. These include: the 1719 founding of a convent for Amerindian women—the first in two hundred years of colonial rule, the 1774 opening of the Hospicio de Pobres—a facility that incarcerated vagrants in order to rehabilitate them, the circa 1775 renovation of Alameda Park—a project joining citywide efforts to better police the population, and the 1778 promulgation of the Royal Pragmatic on Marriages—a bill designed to preserve Spanish hegemony in a racially-diverse context. Each view speaks a separate narrative; by reading the object, audiences gain detailed information about the shifting cultural landscape of eighteenth-century Mexico City.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectClassen
dc.subjectRaceen
dc.subjectMexico Cityen
dc.subjectSanitationen
dc.subjectVisionen
dc.subjectHistory & Theory of Arten
dc.subjectAlameda Parken
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory & Theory of Arten
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWiddifield, Stacie G.en
dc.contributor.chairWiddifield, Stacie G.en
dc.contributor.committeememberWiddifield, Stacie G.en
dc.contributor.committeememberUmberger, Emilyen
dc.contributor.committeememberPlax, Julie-Anneen
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