Psychosocial Stress And Delayed Wound Healing: A Novel Approach To Increase Nursing Awareness And Knowledge

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/556602
Title:
Psychosocial Stress And Delayed Wound Healing: A Novel Approach To Increase Nursing Awareness And Knowledge
Author:
Knight, Elizabeth Dawn
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Background: Chronic wounds are a significant health problem in various populations. Psychosocial stress is a lifestyle factor that has been shown to directly influence wound healing. Current findings support roles for assessment and reduction of psychosocial stress in the comprehensive management of chronic wounds, however, a gap remains between current research and current clinical practice. Purpose: To develop a novel method by which to educate nurses about the effects of psychosocial stress on wound healing while incorporating state-of-the-art technology that is sensitive to the needs of individuals with various learning styles. Objectives: To review current literature documenting the relationship between chronic psychosocial distress and delayed wound healing to identify essential content to include in educational modules for nurses. To develop three educational modules for nurses in inpatient and outpatient settings that address the relationship between chronic psychosocial distress and delayed wound healing, and the effects of stress-reduction interventions in formats that meet the needs of different learning styles. To conduct a focus group discussion with nurse-participants regarding educational module content and delivery methods in order to evaluate and improve these educational modules. Methods: A series of literature reviews were performed between June, 2010 and October, 2013, using articles identified through searches using the databases PubMed and CINAHL. Essential content regarding psychosocial stress and its impact on wound healing was identified, and was used in the development of educational modules, designed to meet the basic needs of individuals with different learning styles. A purposive sample of nurses was recruited through the use of flyers, reviewed the educational modules online, and met for a focus group to discuss their experiences with these modules. Outcomes: A novel method was developed by which to deliver educational material to nurses about psychosocial stress and delayed wound healing. Participants were motivated to learn, had self-awareness of their preferred learning styles, and responded positively to this method of education delivery; they were able to articulate the basic concepts presented in the modules. These findings may be generalizable to a larger audience and may inform the development of future education-delivery approaches in this area.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
delayed wound healing; education delivery; focus group; psychosocial stress; venous leg ulcer; Nursing; chronic wound
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Merkle, Carrie J.
Committee Chair:
Merkle, Carrie J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePsychosocial Stress And Delayed Wound Healing: A Novel Approach To Increase Nursing Awareness And Knowledgeen_US
dc.creatorKnight, Elizabeth Dawnen
dc.contributor.authorKnight, Elizabeth Dawnen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Chronic wounds are a significant health problem in various populations. Psychosocial stress is a lifestyle factor that has been shown to directly influence wound healing. Current findings support roles for assessment and reduction of psychosocial stress in the comprehensive management of chronic wounds, however, a gap remains between current research and current clinical practice. Purpose: To develop a novel method by which to educate nurses about the effects of psychosocial stress on wound healing while incorporating state-of-the-art technology that is sensitive to the needs of individuals with various learning styles. Objectives: To review current literature documenting the relationship between chronic psychosocial distress and delayed wound healing to identify essential content to include in educational modules for nurses. To develop three educational modules for nurses in inpatient and outpatient settings that address the relationship between chronic psychosocial distress and delayed wound healing, and the effects of stress-reduction interventions in formats that meet the needs of different learning styles. To conduct a focus group discussion with nurse-participants regarding educational module content and delivery methods in order to evaluate and improve these educational modules. Methods: A series of literature reviews were performed between June, 2010 and October, 2013, using articles identified through searches using the databases PubMed and CINAHL. Essential content regarding psychosocial stress and its impact on wound healing was identified, and was used in the development of educational modules, designed to meet the basic needs of individuals with different learning styles. A purposive sample of nurses was recruited through the use of flyers, reviewed the educational modules online, and met for a focus group to discuss their experiences with these modules. Outcomes: A novel method was developed by which to deliver educational material to nurses about psychosocial stress and delayed wound healing. Participants were motivated to learn, had self-awareness of their preferred learning styles, and responded positively to this method of education delivery; they were able to articulate the basic concepts presented in the modules. These findings may be generalizable to a larger audience and may inform the development of future education-delivery approaches in this area.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectdelayed wound healingen
dc.subjecteducation deliveryen
dc.subjectfocus groupen
dc.subjectpsychosocial stressen
dc.subjectvenous leg ulceren
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectchronic wounden
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMerkle, Carrie J.en
dc.contributor.chairMerkle, Carrie J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMerkle, Carrie J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberCrist, Janice D.en
dc.contributor.committeememberRigney, Ted S.en
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