Do You Speak "Doctor"? A Communication Skills Training Tool For Hispanic Patients

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/556442
Title:
Do You Speak "Doctor"? A Communication Skills Training Tool For Hispanic Patients
Author:
Hernandez-Martinez, Ana Celia
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Dissertation not available (per author's request) / University of Arizona affiliates may find this title available in the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Full Text database
Abstract:
Effective doctor-patient communication is critical to improving health outcomes. Good communication improves emotional health, symptom resolution, functional and physiologic status, and pain control. Conversely, ineffective communication leads to misdiagnosis, inappropriate treatment poor adherence, misuse of health services, and high patient stress. In the U.S., Hispanics are the fastest growing minority. Despite the high burden of illness among this population, Hispanics are less likely than other minorities to regularly see a health professional. This is explained in part because Hispanics navigate a health system designed for the majority, experience a mismatch between cultural values and health beliefs, and have limited English proficiency. These communication challenges contribute to health disparities among the Hispanic population living in the U.S. Despite the importance of doctor-patient communication, few communication interventions that focus on improving patient skills have been tested in this population. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a patient communication intervention tailored for female Hispanic patients could be practically implemented in a practice setting. The first aim focused on adapting existing communication skills training tools for a Hispanic population. The second aim assessed the feasibility of implementing the training tool in a federally qualified health center in a US-Mexico border community. The third aim explored the extent to which trained patients were able to integrate the information provided. Results indicate that it is feasible to implement communication training when delivered by clinical staff. Patient follow-up revealed that patients valued training on how to communicate with their doctor the most. Moreover, it is feasible to sustain the intervention when it is aligned with the priorities of the clinical site. Patient communication training in medically underserved rural areas could improve barriers to improved health outcomes in communities with a high prevalence of Hispanic patients. Future funding is needed to further test, dissemination of communication training programs.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Federally Qualified Community Health Center; Hispanic Females; Patient Communication Skills Training; Rural Area; US-Mexico Border; Public Health; Doctor-patient Communication
Degree Name:
D.P.H.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Public Health
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gerald, Joe K.
Committee Chair:
Gerald, Joe K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleDo You Speak "Doctor"? A Communication Skills Training Tool For Hispanic Patientsen_US
dc.creatorHernandez-Martinez, Ana Celiaen
dc.contributor.authorHernandez-Martinez, Ana Celiaen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.releaseDissertation not available (per author's request) / University of Arizona affiliates may find this title available in the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Full Text databaseen
dc.description.abstractEffective doctor-patient communication is critical to improving health outcomes. Good communication improves emotional health, symptom resolution, functional and physiologic status, and pain control. Conversely, ineffective communication leads to misdiagnosis, inappropriate treatment poor adherence, misuse of health services, and high patient stress. In the U.S., Hispanics are the fastest growing minority. Despite the high burden of illness among this population, Hispanics are less likely than other minorities to regularly see a health professional. This is explained in part because Hispanics navigate a health system designed for the majority, experience a mismatch between cultural values and health beliefs, and have limited English proficiency. These communication challenges contribute to health disparities among the Hispanic population living in the U.S. Despite the importance of doctor-patient communication, few communication interventions that focus on improving patient skills have been tested in this population. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a patient communication intervention tailored for female Hispanic patients could be practically implemented in a practice setting. The first aim focused on adapting existing communication skills training tools for a Hispanic population. The second aim assessed the feasibility of implementing the training tool in a federally qualified health center in a US-Mexico border community. The third aim explored the extent to which trained patients were able to integrate the information provided. Results indicate that it is feasible to implement communication training when delivered by clinical staff. Patient follow-up revealed that patients valued training on how to communicate with their doctor the most. Moreover, it is feasible to sustain the intervention when it is aligned with the priorities of the clinical site. Patient communication training in medically underserved rural areas could improve barriers to improved health outcomes in communities with a high prevalence of Hispanic patients. Future funding is needed to further test, dissemination of communication training programs.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectFederally Qualified Community Health Centeren
dc.subjectHispanic Femalesen
dc.subjectPatient Communication Skills Trainingen
dc.subjectRural Areaen
dc.subjectUS-Mexico Borderen
dc.subjectPublic Healthen
dc.subjectDoctor-patient Communicationen
thesis.degree.nameD.P.H.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePublic Healthen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorGerald, Joe K.en
dc.contributor.chairGerald, Joe K.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGerald, Joe K.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGarcia, Franciscoen
dc.contributor.committeememberRains, Stephen A.en
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