Dynamic Interviewing Agents: Effects on Deception, Nonverbal Behavior, and Social Desirability

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/556441
Title:
Dynamic Interviewing Agents: Effects on Deception, Nonverbal Behavior, and Social Desirability
Author:
Schuetzler, Ryan M.
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Virtual humans and other virtual agents are becoming more common in our everyday lives. Whether in the form of phone-based personal assistants or automated customer service systems, these technologies have begun to touch more of our activities. This research aims to understand how this technology affects the way we interact with our computer systems. Using a chat bot, I studied the way a conversational computer system affects the way people interact with and perceive automated interviewing systems in two different contexts. Study 1 examines the impact of a conversational agent on behavior during deception. It found that a conversational agent can have a powerful impact on people's perception of the system, resulting in individuals viewing the system as much more engaging and human. The conversational agent further results in a suppression of deception-related cues consistent with a more human-like interaction. Study 2 focuses on the effect of a conversational agent on socially desirable responding. Results of this study indicate that a conversational agent increases social desirability when the topic of the interview is sensitive, but has no effect when the questions are non-sensitive. The results of these two studies indicate that a conversational agent can change the way people interact with a computer system in substantial and meaningful ways. These studies represent a step toward understanding how conversational agents can shape the way we view and interact with computers.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
conversational agent; deception; impression management; social desirability; Management Information Systems; chat bot
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Management Information Systems
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nunamaker, Jay F. Jr

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleDynamic Interviewing Agents: Effects on Deception, Nonverbal Behavior, and Social Desirabilityen_US
dc.creatorSchuetzler, Ryan M.en
dc.contributor.authorSchuetzler, Ryan M.en
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractVirtual humans and other virtual agents are becoming more common in our everyday lives. Whether in the form of phone-based personal assistants or automated customer service systems, these technologies have begun to touch more of our activities. This research aims to understand how this technology affects the way we interact with our computer systems. Using a chat bot, I studied the way a conversational computer system affects the way people interact with and perceive automated interviewing systems in two different contexts. Study 1 examines the impact of a conversational agent on behavior during deception. It found that a conversational agent can have a powerful impact on people's perception of the system, resulting in individuals viewing the system as much more engaging and human. The conversational agent further results in a suppression of deception-related cues consistent with a more human-like interaction. Study 2 focuses on the effect of a conversational agent on socially desirable responding. Results of this study indicate that a conversational agent increases social desirability when the topic of the interview is sensitive, but has no effect when the questions are non-sensitive. The results of these two studies indicate that a conversational agent can change the way people interact with a computer system in substantial and meaningful ways. These studies represent a step toward understanding how conversational agents can shape the way we view and interact with computers.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectconversational agenten
dc.subjectdeceptionen
dc.subjectimpression managementen
dc.subjectsocial desirabilityen
dc.subjectManagement Information Systemsen
dc.subjectchat boten
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineManagement Information Systemsen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorNunamaker, Jay F. Jren
dc.contributor.committeememberNunamaker, Jay F. Jren
dc.contributor.committeememberBurgoon, Judee K.en
dc.contributor.committeememberValacich, Joseph S.en
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