Student Perceptions of Native American Student Affairs at the University of Arizona: What Can We Learn from the Population We Serve?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/556434
Title:
Student Perceptions of Native American Student Affairs at the University of Arizona: What Can We Learn from the Population We Serve?
Author:
Bernadett, Gabriela Maya Matokheosic
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis uses Native American Student Affairs (NASA) at the University of Arizona (UA) as a case study to see where NASA matches and diverges from the current literature on Native American Cultural Centers (NACC). Twenty-eight current Native American undergraduates and graduates were surveyed about their views on NASA, and their responses were then analyzed for common themes. The findings showed that NASA was similar to the current research when it came to themes of community, promoting culture, feeling less isolated, networking, and having an independent space. It diverged on one demographic aspect, namely a significant portion of student respondents came from reservations, which is not reflective of the Native community in the United States as a whole. Additionally, it mentioned the importance of event hosting, which is not mentioned in the current literature at all. The majority of students identified NASA as creating a space for them to feel supported, provide resources, network, and host events that promote awareness of Native American issues. The thesis ends with recommendations for NASA based on the responses, and advocates for further research to delve deeper into the nuances of NACC's and their responsibility to continuously adapt to the needs of their students.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Native American; student; Student Affairs; American Indian Studies; Cultural Center
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tippeconnic-Fox, Mary Jo
Committee Chair:
Tippeconnic-Fox, Mary Jo

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleStudent Perceptions of Native American Student Affairs at the University of Arizona: What Can We Learn from the Population We Serve?en_US
dc.creatorBernadett, Gabriela Maya Matokheosicen
dc.contributor.authorBernadett, Gabriela Maya Matokheosicen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis uses Native American Student Affairs (NASA) at the University of Arizona (UA) as a case study to see where NASA matches and diverges from the current literature on Native American Cultural Centers (NACC). Twenty-eight current Native American undergraduates and graduates were surveyed about their views on NASA, and their responses were then analyzed for common themes. The findings showed that NASA was similar to the current research when it came to themes of community, promoting culture, feeling less isolated, networking, and having an independent space. It diverged on one demographic aspect, namely a significant portion of student respondents came from reservations, which is not reflective of the Native community in the United States as a whole. Additionally, it mentioned the importance of event hosting, which is not mentioned in the current literature at all. The majority of students identified NASA as creating a space for them to feel supported, provide resources, network, and host events that promote awareness of Native American issues. The thesis ends with recommendations for NASA based on the responses, and advocates for further research to delve deeper into the nuances of NACC's and their responsibility to continuously adapt to the needs of their students.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectNative Americanen
dc.subjectstudenten
dc.subjectStudent Affairsen
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen
dc.subjectCultural Centeren
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorTippeconnic-Fox, Mary Joen
dc.contributor.chairTippeconnic-Fox, Mary Joen
dc.contributor.committeememberTippeconnic-Fox, Mary Joen
dc.contributor.committeememberLuna-Firebaugh, Eileenen
dc.contributor.committeememberBegay, Manleyen
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