Measuring and Controlling Energy Level Alignment at Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Semiconductor Interfaces

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/556212
Title:
Measuring and Controlling Energy Level Alignment at Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Semiconductor Interfaces
Author:
Racke, David
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this dissertation, I present the results of my research regarding hybrid semiconductor interfaces between organic and inorganic semiconductors. Using photoemission spectroscopy, I elucidate the important role of defect-induced electronic states within the inorganic semiconductor phase. These states significantly affect both the energy level alignment and the charge carrier dynamics at the hybrid interface. I demonstrate that the behavior of these hybrid semiconductor interfaces is complex and not well characterized by current models for organic semiconductor interfaces. Specifically, I show that hybrid interfaces host unique electronic phenomena that depend sensitively on the surface structure of the inorganic semiconductor. I also demonstrate new applications of photoemission spectroscopies that enable the direct analysis of important properties of inorganic semiconductors, including charge carrier behavior near hybrid interfaces and the electronic character of defect-induced energy levels. The research presented here focuses on two different n-type inorganic semiconductors, tin disulfide (SnS₂) and zinc oxide (ZnO). SnS₂ is a layered transition metal dichalcogenide that presents an atomically flat and inert surface, ideal for sensitively probing electronic interactions at the hybrid interface. To probe the electronic structure of the SnS₂ surface, I used a variety of organic molecules, including copper phthalocyanine, vanadyl naphthalocyanine, chloro-boron subphthalocyanine, and C₆₀. ZnO has a complex surface structure that can be modified by simple experimental procedures; it was therefore used as a tunable semiconductor substrate where the effects of altered electronic structure can be observed. By carefully studying the origin of hybrid interfacial interactions, these research projects provide a first step in explicitly elucidating the fundamental mechanisms that determine the electronic properties of hybrid interfaces.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Photoemission; Semiconductor; Transition Metal Dichalcogenide; Zinc oxide; Chemistry; Interface
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Monti, Oliver L. A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleMeasuring and Controlling Energy Level Alignment at Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Semiconductor Interfacesen_US
dc.creatorRacke, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorRacke, Daviden
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, I present the results of my research regarding hybrid semiconductor interfaces between organic and inorganic semiconductors. Using photoemission spectroscopy, I elucidate the important role of defect-induced electronic states within the inorganic semiconductor phase. These states significantly affect both the energy level alignment and the charge carrier dynamics at the hybrid interface. I demonstrate that the behavior of these hybrid semiconductor interfaces is complex and not well characterized by current models for organic semiconductor interfaces. Specifically, I show that hybrid interfaces host unique electronic phenomena that depend sensitively on the surface structure of the inorganic semiconductor. I also demonstrate new applications of photoemission spectroscopies that enable the direct analysis of important properties of inorganic semiconductors, including charge carrier behavior near hybrid interfaces and the electronic character of defect-induced energy levels. The research presented here focuses on two different n-type inorganic semiconductors, tin disulfide (SnS₂) and zinc oxide (ZnO). SnS₂ is a layered transition metal dichalcogenide that presents an atomically flat and inert surface, ideal for sensitively probing electronic interactions at the hybrid interface. To probe the electronic structure of the SnS₂ surface, I used a variety of organic molecules, including copper phthalocyanine, vanadyl naphthalocyanine, chloro-boron subphthalocyanine, and C₆₀. ZnO has a complex surface structure that can be modified by simple experimental procedures; it was therefore used as a tunable semiconductor substrate where the effects of altered electronic structure can be observed. By carefully studying the origin of hybrid interfacial interactions, these research projects provide a first step in explicitly elucidating the fundamental mechanisms that determine the electronic properties of hybrid interfaces.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectPhotoemissionen
dc.subjectSemiconductoren
dc.subjectTransition Metal Dichalcogenideen
dc.subjectZinc oxideen
dc.subjectChemistryen
dc.subjectInterfaceen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMonti, Oliver L. A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberArmstrong, Neal R.en
dc.contributor.committeememberPemberton, Jeanne E.en
dc.contributor.committeememberHeien, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBrown, Michael F.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMonti, Oliver L. A.en
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