Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/555995
Title:
Seeding rates for small grains in Arizona
Author:
Ottman, Michael J.
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
May-2015
Description:
Revised; Originally Published: 2004; 3 pp.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/555995
Abstract:
Wheat and barley are the two major small grain crops in Arizona. These crops can produce yields near maximum at a wide range of seeding rates due to yield component compensation. Grain yield is determined by plants per unit area, tillers per plant, kernels per head, and kernel weight. At a low seeding rate, the plant will compensate for fewer plants per unit area by producing more tillers per plant and larger heads. At a high seeding rate, fewer tillers are produced compared to a low seeding rate, and the heads are smaller. Therefore, grain yields near maximum can be produced at a wide range of seeding rates if conditions are favorable (see Fig. 1). Weed control can be a problem at low seeding rates and lodging may be a problem at high seeding rates. The optimum seeding rate for small grains depends on a variety of factors which will be discussed
Type:
text; Book
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
emergence; depth; viability; variety
Series/Report no.:
University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Service and Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin AZ1334-2015

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOttman, Michael J.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-28T17:40:35Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-28T17:40:35Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/555995en
dc.descriptionRevised; Originally Published: 2004en
dc.description3 pp.en_US
dc.description.abstractWheat and barley are the two major small grain crops in Arizona. These crops can produce yields near maximum at a wide range of seeding rates due to yield component compensation. Grain yield is determined by plants per unit area, tillers per plant, kernels per head, and kernel weight. At a low seeding rate, the plant will compensate for fewer plants per unit area by producing more tillers per plant and larger heads. At a high seeding rate, fewer tillers are produced compared to a low seeding rate, and the heads are smaller. Therefore, grain yields near maximum can be produced at a wide range of seeding rates if conditions are favorable (see Fig. 1). Weed control can be a problem at low seeding rates and lodging may be a problem at high seeding rates. The optimum seeding rate for small grains depends on a variety of factors which will be discusseden
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Arizona Cooperative Extension Service and Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin AZ1334-2015en
dc.sourceCALS Publications Archive. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectemergenceen
dc.subjectdepthen
dc.subjectviabilityen
dc.subjectvarietyen
dc.titleSeeding rates for small grains in Arizonaen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeBooken_US
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