Distribution of the Exotic Mustard Brassica tournefortii in the Mohawk Dunes and Mountain, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/555910
Title:
Distribution of the Exotic Mustard Brassica tournefortii in the Mohawk Dunes and Mountain, Arizona
Author:
Malusa, Jim; Halvorson, Bill; Angell, Deborah
Affiliation:
Sonoran Desert Field Station, US Geological Survey, School of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Arizona
Publisher:
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Desert Plants
Rights:
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.
Collection Information:
Desert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.
Issue Date:
Jun-2003
Abstract:
Ample winter-spring rains in southwestern Arizona in early 2001 allowed us to map the range of the exotic Brassica tournefortii in the Mohawk Sand Dunes. The mustard has colonized habitat ranging from creosote flats to dune crests, but it is most successful along ephemeral watercourses, the base of north-facing dunes, and along roads. An estimated 80-90% of the Mohawk Dunes, in both the Mohawk Valley and San Cristobal Valley, are host to B. tournefortii, with only the southernmost portion of the dunes uncolonized. Outside of the dunes, the mustard was found largely along roads frequented by the Border Patrol.
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0734-3434

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMalusa, Jimen
dc.contributor.authorHalvorson, Billen
dc.contributor.authorAngell, Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-27T16:31:12Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-27T16:31:12Zen
dc.date.issued2003-06en
dc.identifier.issn0734-3434en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/555910en
dc.description.abstractAmple winter-spring rains in southwestern Arizona in early 2001 allowed us to map the range of the exotic Brassica tournefortii in the Mohawk Sand Dunes. The mustard has colonized habitat ranging from creosote flats to dune crests, but it is most successful along ephemeral watercourses, the base of north-facing dunes, and along roads. An estimated 80-90% of the Mohawk Dunes, in both the Mohawk Valley and San Cristobal Valley, are host to B. tournefortii, with only the southernmost portion of the dunes uncolonized. Outside of the dunes, the mustard was found largely along roads frequented by the Border Patrol.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceCALS Publications Archive. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleDistribution of the Exotic Mustard Brassica tournefortii in the Mohawk Dunes and Mountain, Arizonaen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSonoran Desert Field Station, US Geological Survey, School of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalDesert Plantsen
dc.description.collectioninformationDesert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.en_US
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