Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/555854
Title:
Traditional Navajo Culture is a Protective Factor
Author:
Tafoya, Matthew Kirk
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
"Traditional Navajo Culture is a Protective Factor" is intended for those who have a stake in Indigenous spiritual, mental, physical, and emotional health. Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians are Indigenous minorities in the USA that tend to consistently top the charts in deficient measures like depression, diabetes, heart disease, obesity, domestic violence, substance use/abuse, and suicide. The West does not offer any explanation as to the cause but is trying to fight these diseases and disorders by allocating federal funds for tribes, urban Indians, and Native groups to devise ways to minimize negative health effects by employing prevention practices that respect and are informed by the local Native cultures. This thesis examines these public health issues from a modern Indigenous perspective that use Navajo specific examples that combine both Western and Indigenous philosophies and paradigms to propose a solution that is strength-based, culturally-informed, and locally-driven.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
culture; native american; post-colonial; protective factors; suicide prevention; American Indian Studies; american indian
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stoffle, Richard
Committee Chair:
Stoffle, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTraditional Navajo Culture is a Protective Factoren_US
dc.creatorTafoya, Matthew Kirken
dc.contributor.authorTafoya, Matthew Kirken
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstract"Traditional Navajo Culture is a Protective Factor" is intended for those who have a stake in Indigenous spiritual, mental, physical, and emotional health. Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians are Indigenous minorities in the USA that tend to consistently top the charts in deficient measures like depression, diabetes, heart disease, obesity, domestic violence, substance use/abuse, and suicide. The West does not offer any explanation as to the cause but is trying to fight these diseases and disorders by allocating federal funds for tribes, urban Indians, and Native groups to devise ways to minimize negative health effects by employing prevention practices that respect and are informed by the local Native cultures. This thesis examines these public health issues from a modern Indigenous perspective that use Navajo specific examples that combine both Western and Indigenous philosophies and paradigms to propose a solution that is strength-based, culturally-informed, and locally-driven.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectcultureen
dc.subjectnative americanen
dc.subjectpost-colonialen
dc.subjectprotective factorsen
dc.subjectsuicide preventionen
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen
dc.subjectamerican indianen
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorStoffle, Richarden
dc.contributor.chairStoffle, Richarden
dc.contributor.committeememberStoffle, Richarden
dc.contributor.committeememberTippeconnic-Fox, Mary Joen
dc.contributor.committeememberTeufel-Shone, Nicoletteen
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