Developing the Object-Oriented Dynamic Mosquito Simulation Model (DYMSIM)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/555565
Title:
Developing the Object-Oriented Dynamic Mosquito Simulation Model (DYMSIM)
Author:
Sen, Sonia
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Projected changes in climate pose a variety of potentially harmful outcomes for the current Earth system, including the rates of vector-borne infectious diseases. The Dynamic Mosquito Simulation Model (DyMSiM) was previously developed to model and predict the rates of mosquito-borne infectious diseases based on precipitation and temperature data. Based in Stella, a development software program, the model’s current setup limits functionality and speed whereas an object-oriented version of the DyMSiM software was identified as potentially alleviating those constraints. The conversion into an object-oriented model offered the freedom of access to users, customizability, and more specific outputs among other features. Java was used in programming the model, which consisted of six different classes: Model, Container, EggBatch, LarvaeBatch, PupaeBatch, and Adult. The Java model code enabled climate data (precipitation and temperature) to be entered via an Excel spreadsheet. The egg, larval, and pupal stages of the mosquito lifecycle were treated as “batches” in which a cohort of multiple simulated developing mosquitoes go through the same process together. This method was not used, however, for the Adult stage of the mosquito, as Adults were instantiated as their own respective objects in the model. The model was validated against the Stella version using example data from San Juan, Puerto Rico in 2010 and 2011. Resulting model outputs of infectious mosquitoes were found to be within an order of magnitude as the Stella model. The development of this object-oriented model has created the foundation upon which many new specifications and additional features to the model can be made to enhance the study of mosquito-borne diseases around the world.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Geography
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleDeveloping the Object-Oriented Dynamic Mosquito Simulation Model (DYMSIM)en_US
dc.creatorSen, Soniaen
dc.contributor.authorSen, Soniaen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractProjected changes in climate pose a variety of potentially harmful outcomes for the current Earth system, including the rates of vector-borne infectious diseases. The Dynamic Mosquito Simulation Model (DyMSiM) was previously developed to model and predict the rates of mosquito-borne infectious diseases based on precipitation and temperature data. Based in Stella, a development software program, the model’s current setup limits functionality and speed whereas an object-oriented version of the DyMSiM software was identified as potentially alleviating those constraints. The conversion into an object-oriented model offered the freedom of access to users, customizability, and more specific outputs among other features. Java was used in programming the model, which consisted of six different classes: Model, Container, EggBatch, LarvaeBatch, PupaeBatch, and Adult. The Java model code enabled climate data (precipitation and temperature) to be entered via an Excel spreadsheet. The egg, larval, and pupal stages of the mosquito lifecycle were treated as “batches” in which a cohort of multiple simulated developing mosquitoes go through the same process together. This method was not used, however, for the Adult stage of the mosquito, as Adults were instantiated as their own respective objects in the model. The model was validated against the Stella version using example data from San Juan, Puerto Rico in 2010 and 2011. Resulting model outputs of infectious mosquitoes were found to be within an order of magnitude as the Stella model. The development of this object-oriented model has created the foundation upon which many new specifications and additional features to the model can be made to enhance the study of mosquito-borne diseases around the world.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
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