Kangaroo Care, Facilitated Tucking and Non-Nutritive Sucking to Reduce Pain in Neonates: A Best Practice Proposal

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/555541
Title:
Kangaroo Care, Facilitated Tucking and Non-Nutritive Sucking to Reduce Pain in Neonates: A Best Practice Proposal
Author:
Hartley, Kelsey Alexis
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Increasing survival rates of preterm infants and a greater understanding of the long-term consequences of prematurity and early exposure to pain have generated a greater need for non-pharmacological pain management measures in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) setting. These pain management interventions are necessary to decrease the potentially unfavorable consequences of early exposure to pain, and to promote positive long-term outcomes in this 5 population. The purpose of this thesis was to propose a best practice plan for kangaroo care, facilitated tucking and non-nutritive sucking interventions for infants receiving care in the NICU. Synthesis of available research is presented to support the use of these interventions as methods of non-pharmacological pain management, and to formulate policies for implementation in the hospital setting. Policies included in this paper were specifically developed for use in the NICU at St. Joseph's hospital in Tucson, Arizona. Effectiveness of the aforementioned interventions will be evaluated using an informal written questionnaire, distributed to nurses on the targeted unit.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.N.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleKangaroo Care, Facilitated Tucking and Non-Nutritive Sucking to Reduce Pain in Neonates: A Best Practice Proposalen_US
dc.creatorHartley, Kelsey Alexisen
dc.contributor.authorHartley, Kelsey Alexisen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIncreasing survival rates of preterm infants and a greater understanding of the long-term consequences of prematurity and early exposure to pain have generated a greater need for non-pharmacological pain management measures in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) setting. These pain management interventions are necessary to decrease the potentially unfavorable consequences of early exposure to pain, and to promote positive long-term outcomes in this 5 population. The purpose of this thesis was to propose a best practice plan for kangaroo care, facilitated tucking and non-nutritive sucking interventions for infants receiving care in the NICU. Synthesis of available research is presented to support the use of these interventions as methods of non-pharmacological pain management, and to formulate policies for implementation in the hospital setting. Policies included in this paper were specifically developed for use in the NICU at St. Joseph's hospital in Tucson, Arizona. Effectiveness of the aforementioned interventions will be evaluated using an informal written questionnaire, distributed to nurses on the targeted unit.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.N.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
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