Evidence-Based Recommendations for Nursing Education for Prevention of Primary Cesarean Sections: A Best Practice Approach

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/555540
Title:
Evidence-Based Recommendations for Nursing Education for Prevention of Primary Cesarean Sections: A Best Practice Approach
Author:
Diola, Lea Jenn
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this thesis was to develop a best practice pocket guide to prevent primary cesarean sections. Cesarean section accounts for one-third of deliveries in the United States (Branch & Silver, 2012). Cesarean section rates have skyrocketed from 20.7% in 1996 to 32.8% in 2012 (Osterman & Martin, 2014). The major driver for the increased rates is the rise in primary cesarean sections, which accounts for 60% of the increase (Osterman & Martin, 2012). Compared to vaginal delivery, cesarean delivery is associated with increased maternal and neonatal morbidity (Chapman & Durham, 2010). Although in certain cases cesarean delivery is best for the mother and the fetus, in low-risk pregnancies, cesarean section may pose greater risks compared to vaginal delivery, especially in relation to future pregnancies (Caughey, Cahill, Guise, & Rouse, 2014; Berghella, 2014). The most effective method to reduce overall morbidity is the prevention of the first cesarean (Caughey et al., 2014). Implementing an evidence-based pocket guide for nurses and certified childbirth educators will provide them with best practice recommendations in order to prevent primary cesarean sections. The pocket guide can also be utilized by providers in educating mothers regarding cesarean sections, to aid them in making informed decisions.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.N.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEvidence-Based Recommendations for Nursing Education for Prevention of Primary Cesarean Sections: A Best Practice Approachen_US
dc.creatorDiola, Lea Jennen
dc.contributor.authorDiola, Lea Jennen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this thesis was to develop a best practice pocket guide to prevent primary cesarean sections. Cesarean section accounts for one-third of deliveries in the United States (Branch & Silver, 2012). Cesarean section rates have skyrocketed from 20.7% in 1996 to 32.8% in 2012 (Osterman & Martin, 2014). The major driver for the increased rates is the rise in primary cesarean sections, which accounts for 60% of the increase (Osterman & Martin, 2012). Compared to vaginal delivery, cesarean delivery is associated with increased maternal and neonatal morbidity (Chapman & Durham, 2010). Although in certain cases cesarean delivery is best for the mother and the fetus, in low-risk pregnancies, cesarean section may pose greater risks compared to vaginal delivery, especially in relation to future pregnancies (Caughey, Cahill, Guise, & Rouse, 2014; Berghella, 2014). The most effective method to reduce overall morbidity is the prevention of the first cesarean (Caughey et al., 2014). Implementing an evidence-based pocket guide for nurses and certified childbirth educators will provide them with best practice recommendations in order to prevent primary cesarean sections. The pocket guide can also be utilized by providers in educating mothers regarding cesarean sections, to aid them in making informed decisions.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.N.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
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