Sleep and Language Development in Toddlers with Down Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorders

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/555525
Title:
Sleep and Language Development in Toddlers with Down Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorders
Author:
Demara, Bianca Izabel
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Previous research has indicated that sleep is crucial for proper cognitive functioning (Hill et al., 2011). Currently, there is a lack of research that looks at the relationship between sleep and language development in the first years of human development. However, from the existing literature, there is evidence that sleep can help integrate new words into children’s vocabulary and facilitate phonemic expression (Henderson, 2012; Gaskell et al., 2014). However, most studies that have explored the intersection between sleep and language have only done so with typical children. Individuals with neurodevelopmental disabilities are more likely to have sleep disturbances (Wiggs & Stores, 1996), which are likely deleterious to their language development, among many other cognitive processes. In this study, we investigated the relationship between sleep and language development in toddlers with Down syndrome (DS) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We found that toddlers with DS had the most impacted sleep and the greatest language delays. We also found a preliminary correlation between sleep disturbances and language development, with increases in sleep disturbances relating to reduced language development. These findings, when expanded to a larger sample, could have important treatment implications for early language dysfunction. Overall, more research is needed to further elucidate the intricacies of the relationship between sleep and language development in toddlers with developmental disabilities.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSleep and Language Development in Toddlers with Down Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disordersen_US
dc.creatorDemara, Bianca Izabelen
dc.contributor.authorDemara, Bianca Izabelen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has indicated that sleep is crucial for proper cognitive functioning (Hill et al., 2011). Currently, there is a lack of research that looks at the relationship between sleep and language development in the first years of human development. However, from the existing literature, there is evidence that sleep can help integrate new words into children’s vocabulary and facilitate phonemic expression (Henderson, 2012; Gaskell et al., 2014). However, most studies that have explored the intersection between sleep and language have only done so with typical children. Individuals with neurodevelopmental disabilities are more likely to have sleep disturbances (Wiggs & Stores, 1996), which are likely deleterious to their language development, among many other cognitive processes. In this study, we investigated the relationship between sleep and language development in toddlers with Down syndrome (DS) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We found that toddlers with DS had the most impacted sleep and the greatest language delays. We also found a preliminary correlation between sleep disturbances and language development, with increases in sleep disturbances relating to reduced language development. These findings, when expanded to a larger sample, could have important treatment implications for early language dysfunction. Overall, more research is needed to further elucidate the intricacies of the relationship between sleep and language development in toddlers with developmental disabilities.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
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