Screening Mothers for Postpartum Depression: A Guide for Pediactric and Obstetric Advanced Practice Nurses

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/555524
Title:
Screening Mothers for Postpartum Depression: A Guide for Pediactric and Obstetric Advanced Practice Nurses
Author:
Collins-Lewis, Hannah Marie
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Postpartum depression (PPD) is a prominent mental health issue in 10-15% of mothers after childbirth. Untreated PPD has a large impact on the family unit, especially the children, and can result in affected psychosocial development, psychiatric disorders, or violent behavior. The following symptoms may be present: loss of interest in activities, sleep and appetite disturbances, negative feelings, and thoughts of self-harm. Several themes have emerged regarding the lack of screening and intervention by primary care providers. This guide will explore those themes and discuss what pediatric/obstetric nurse practitioners can do to improve screening and detection rates. These practitioners are among the first postpartum mothers and families will come into contact with. Therefore, these practitioners have an opportune moment to provide early screening, detection, and intervention. This can be done correctly and successfully via clinical indicators and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). By advancing education and training, along with having referrals and resources on-hand, practitioners have a better opportunity at providing affected postpartum women with quality and timely healthcare.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.N.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleScreening Mothers for Postpartum Depression: A Guide for Pediactric and Obstetric Advanced Practice Nursesen_US
dc.creatorCollins-Lewis, Hannah Marieen
dc.contributor.authorCollins-Lewis, Hannah Marieen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractPostpartum depression (PPD) is a prominent mental health issue in 10-15% of mothers after childbirth. Untreated PPD has a large impact on the family unit, especially the children, and can result in affected psychosocial development, psychiatric disorders, or violent behavior. The following symptoms may be present: loss of interest in activities, sleep and appetite disturbances, negative feelings, and thoughts of self-harm. Several themes have emerged regarding the lack of screening and intervention by primary care providers. This guide will explore those themes and discuss what pediatric/obstetric nurse practitioners can do to improve screening and detection rates. These practitioners are among the first postpartum mothers and families will come into contact with. Therefore, these practitioners have an opportune moment to provide early screening, detection, and intervention. This can be done correctly and successfully via clinical indicators and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). By advancing education and training, along with having referrals and resources on-hand, practitioners have a better opportunity at providing affected postpartum women with quality and timely healthcare.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.N.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
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