Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/554346
Title:
Tissue Culture and Cloning of Carnegiea gigantea, Cactaceae
Author:
Baker, William P.; Hanks, Tyrone Harvard; Marin, Louis Eduardo
Affiliation:
Biomedical Sciences, Midwestern University; Life Sciences Department, Mesa Community College
Publisher:
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Desert Plants
Rights:
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.
Collection Information:
Desert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.
Issue Date:
20-May-2015
Abstract:
Cloning has become an established method of supplying valuable timber trees and other plants for commercial purposes. Cloning of these plants allows multiple copies to be produced from superior phenotypes. In this study, in vitro clones were produced from phenotypically selected, commercially available saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea). The clones were produced from tissue plugs obtained from surface sterilized saguaro. The plugs were transferred using standard aseptic technique to culture dishes containing solid Callus Initiation Medium (Gamborg's B-5 medium supplemented with 10 mg/l auxin and 8 g/l agar). The cultures were incubated under continuous cool fluorescent lights at 24 C until callus formation was observed. Healthy callus were transferred to solid Development Medium (Gamborg's B-5 medium supplemented with 10 mg/l auxin, 10.0 mg Kinetin, and 8 g/l agar) and further incubated. Resulting clones were prepared for in vivo conditions by transfer to sterile potting soil and successfully outplanted to the green house. Such clones may supply scarce C. gigantea for future research. The use of single genotypes for ecological applications should be avoided since they lack natural population variability.
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0734-3434

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBaker, William P.en
dc.contributor.authorHanks, Tyrone Harvarden
dc.contributor.authorMarin, Louis Eduardoen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-20T18:51:39Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-20T18:51:39Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05-20en
dc.identifier.issn0734-3434en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/554346en
dc.description.abstractCloning has become an established method of supplying valuable timber trees and other plants for commercial purposes. Cloning of these plants allows multiple copies to be produced from superior phenotypes. In this study, in vitro clones were produced from phenotypically selected, commercially available saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea). The clones were produced from tissue plugs obtained from surface sterilized saguaro. The plugs were transferred using standard aseptic technique to culture dishes containing solid Callus Initiation Medium (Gamborg's B-5 medium supplemented with 10 mg/l auxin and 8 g/l agar). The cultures were incubated under continuous cool fluorescent lights at 24 C until callus formation was observed. Healthy callus were transferred to solid Development Medium (Gamborg's B-5 medium supplemented with 10 mg/l auxin, 10.0 mg Kinetin, and 8 g/l agar) and further incubated. Resulting clones were prepared for in vivo conditions by transfer to sterile potting soil and successfully outplanted to the green house. Such clones may supply scarce C. gigantea for future research. The use of single genotypes for ecological applications should be avoided since they lack natural population variability.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceCALS Publications Archive. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleTissue Culture and Cloning of Carnegiea gigantea, Cactaceaeen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiomedical Sciences, Midwestern Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentLife Sciences Department, Mesa Community Collegeen
dc.identifier.journalDesert Plantsen
dc.description.collectioninformationDesert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.en_US
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