Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/554212
Title:
Chromosome and Hybridization Studies of Agave
Author:
Pinkava, Donald J.; Baker, Mark A.
Affiliation:
Department of Botany and Microbiology, Arizona State University
Publisher:
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Desert Plants
Rights:
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.
Collection Information:
Desert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.
Issue Date:
1985
Abstract:
Interspecific hybridization, paleopolyploidy, secondary polyploidy, and vegetative reproduction appear to play significant roles in the evolution of Agave and certain related genera. First chromosome counts are reported for Hesperaloe funifera and 10 taxa of Agave including two triploid and one diploid putative hybrids. All of our counts for Yucca, Hesperaloe, and Agave are in agreement with the base number, x = 30, which comprises a complement of five very large chromosomes and 25 medium to small chromosomes. All published chromosome counts of Agave have been tabulated and the roles of hybridization and polyploidy are assessed. Secondary polyploidy occurs in 26 of 48 (54.2 %) reported taxa of Agave; as yet only one-fourth of the total taxa are chromosomally known.
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0734-3434

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPinkava, Donald J.en
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Mark A.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-19T16:22:57Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-19T16:22:57Zen
dc.date.issued1985en
dc.identifier.issn0734-3434en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/554212en
dc.description.abstractInterspecific hybridization, paleopolyploidy, secondary polyploidy, and vegetative reproduction appear to play significant roles in the evolution of Agave and certain related genera. First chromosome counts are reported for Hesperaloe funifera and 10 taxa of Agave including two triploid and one diploid putative hybrids. All of our counts for Yucca, Hesperaloe, and Agave are in agreement with the base number, x = 30, which comprises a complement of five very large chromosomes and 25 medium to small chromosomes. All published chromosome counts of Agave have been tabulated and the roles of hybridization and polyploidy are assessed. Secondary polyploidy occurs in 26 of 48 (54.2 %) reported taxa of Agave; as yet only one-fourth of the total taxa are chromosomally known.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceCALS Publications Archive. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleChromosome and Hybridization Studies of Agaveen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Botany and Microbiology, Arizona State Universityen
dc.identifier.journalDesert Plantsen
dc.description.collectioninformationDesert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.en_US
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