Water Relations and Carbon Dioxide Uptake of Agave deserti - Special Adaptations to Desert Climates

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/554207
Title:
Water Relations and Carbon Dioxide Uptake of Agave deserti - Special Adaptations to Desert Climates
Author:
Nobel, Park S.
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, University of California at Los Angeles; Laboratory of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles
Publisher:
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Desert Plants
Rights:
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.
Collection Information:
Desert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.
Issue Date:
1985
Abstract:
Agave deserti Engelm., a common agave of the Sonoran Desert, possesses Crassulacean acid metabolism. Thus, the main period for stomatal opening and net CO, uptake is at night, which leads to a high water -use efficiency. Seedling establishment occurs only when enough water -storage capacity can be generated following germination so that the young seedling can withstand the first drought. Agave deserti is only moderately tolerant of low tissue temperatures but extremely tolerant of high tissue temperatures, an important desert adaptation. Its rosette growth habit leads to a relatively uniform distribution of photosynthetically active radiation over the leaves, which contributes to its high productivity for a desert plant.
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0734-3434

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNobel, Park S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-19T16:18:15Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-19T16:18:15Zen
dc.date.issued1985en
dc.identifier.issn0734-3434en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/554207en
dc.description.abstractAgave deserti Engelm., a common agave of the Sonoran Desert, possesses Crassulacean acid metabolism. Thus, the main period for stomatal opening and net CO, uptake is at night, which leads to a high water -use efficiency. Seedling establishment occurs only when enough water -storage capacity can be generated following germination so that the young seedling can withstand the first drought. Agave deserti is only moderately tolerant of low tissue temperatures but extremely tolerant of high tissue temperatures, an important desert adaptation. Its rosette growth habit leads to a relatively uniform distribution of photosynthetically active radiation over the leaves, which contributes to its high productivity for a desert plant.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceCALS Publications Archive. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleWater Relations and Carbon Dioxide Uptake of Agave deserti - Special Adaptations to Desert Climatesen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biology, University of California at Los Angelesen
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, University of California at Los Angelesen
dc.identifier.journalDesert Plantsen
dc.description.collectioninformationDesert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.en_US
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