Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/553052
Title:
EcoDistricts: Bridging the Gap Between Plans and Projects
Author:
Agbannawag, Constante
Issue Date:
18-May-2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Sustainable Built Environments collection. For more information, contact http://sbe.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
As cities around the country are experiencing renewed development, growth, and investment, the concepts of sustainable development are being implemented to help create built environments, which benefit the citizens, the environment, and the economy. These sustainability concepts are often included in a city’s comprehensive plan, or are prepared in a separate planning document. The non-profit, Portland, OR based organization, EcoDistricts, has noted that often these sustainability values and policies fall short of creating or implementing tangible change in the built environment due to lack of support, funding, or any number of other restrictive factors. The EcoDistricts approach is one that involves communities and partnerships with governments and other organizations to develop plans for small districts within a city, to guide and encourage sustainable development projects within that district. This paper is a qualitative analysis comparing the comprehensive and sustainability plans to the EcoDistrict plans of three projects to determine how EcoDistrict plans implement sustainability projects compared to a cities comprehensive or sustainability plan. The cities and projects studied include, the Seaholm EcoDistrict in Austin, TX; the Little Tokyo EcoDistrict in Los Angeles, CA; and the SW EcoDistrict in Washington D.C.
Description:
Sustainable Built Environments Senior Capstone
Type:
text
Mentor:
Anderson, Ryan
Instructor:
Keith, Ladd; Iuliano, Joey

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAgbannawag, Constanteen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-18T04:48:45Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-18T04:48:45Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05-18en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/553052en
dc.descriptionSustainable Built Environments Senior Capstoneen
dc.description.abstractAs cities around the country are experiencing renewed development, growth, and investment, the concepts of sustainable development are being implemented to help create built environments, which benefit the citizens, the environment, and the economy. These sustainability concepts are often included in a city’s comprehensive plan, or are prepared in a separate planning document. The non-profit, Portland, OR based organization, EcoDistricts, has noted that often these sustainability values and policies fall short of creating or implementing tangible change in the built environment due to lack of support, funding, or any number of other restrictive factors. The EcoDistricts approach is one that involves communities and partnerships with governments and other organizations to develop plans for small districts within a city, to guide and encourage sustainable development projects within that district. This paper is a qualitative analysis comparing the comprehensive and sustainability plans to the EcoDistrict plans of three projects to determine how EcoDistrict plans implement sustainability projects compared to a cities comprehensive or sustainability plan. The cities and projects studied include, the Seaholm EcoDistrict in Austin, TX; the Little Tokyo EcoDistrict in Los Angeles, CA; and the SW EcoDistrict in Washington D.C.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleEcoDistricts: Bridging the Gap Between Plans and Projectsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architectureen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Sustainable Built Environments collection. For more information, contact http://sbe.arizona.edu.en
dc.contributor.mentorAnderson, Ryanen_US
dc.contributor.instructorKeith, Ladd; Iuliano, Joeyen_US
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