Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/552713
Title:
End-of-Life Care in American Indian Populations of the Southwest
Author:
Law, Emily
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
13-May-2015
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
American Indians and American Native (AI/AN) populations have faced health disparities for a period of time. Although their incidence for some chronic diseases such as cancer, may be lower than the general population, they suffer from the poorest survival rates of any ethnic group. As the AI/AN populations age and live longer with chronic disease as seen with the rest of the general population, the discussion of palliative care is becoming more important. Currently, there is not a lot of literature about palliative care that is specific to the AI/AN population. The paucity of research serves as an impetus to learn and examine the need of available palliative care resources for the AI/AN populations. We present the analysis of twenty interviews with staff members of local hospice organizations and hospitals. The interview questions ask participants about their views and experiences in delivering palliative care. Through these discussions, we investigate the current needs, social and cultural barriers, and the infrastructure of how palliative care is accessed and delivered.
Keywords:
End of Life Care; American Indian; Alaskan Native; Hospice
MeSH Subjects:
Palliative Care; Terminal Care; Indians, North American; Inuits; Hospices; Hospice Care; Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Trujillo, Michael MD, MPH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEnd-of-Life Care in American Indian Populations of the Southwesten_US
dc.contributor.authorLaw, Emilyen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.date.issued2015-05-13en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractAmerican Indians and American Native (AI/AN) populations have faced health disparities for a period of time. Although their incidence for some chronic diseases such as cancer, may be lower than the general population, they suffer from the poorest survival rates of any ethnic group. As the AI/AN populations age and live longer with chronic disease as seen with the rest of the general population, the discussion of palliative care is becoming more important. Currently, there is not a lot of literature about palliative care that is specific to the AI/AN population. The paucity of research serves as an impetus to learn and examine the need of available palliative care resources for the AI/AN populations. We present the analysis of twenty interviews with staff members of local hospice organizations and hospitals. The interview questions ask participants about their views and experiences in delivering palliative care. Through these discussions, we investigate the current needs, social and cultural barriers, and the infrastructure of how palliative care is accessed and delivered.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subjectEnd of Life Careen
dc.subjectAmerican Indianen
dc.subjectAlaskan Nativeen
dc.subjectHospiceen
dc.subject.meshPalliative Careen
dc.subject.meshTerminal Careen
dc.subject.meshIndians, North Americanen
dc.subject.meshInuitsen
dc.subject.meshHospicesen
dc.subject.meshHospice Careen
dc.subject.meshHospice and Palliative Care Nursingen
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.contributor.mentorTrujillo, Michael MD, MPHen
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