Sub-surface Watering of Tree Seedlings in Arid Regions Using Discarded Plastic Infusion Sets

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/552244
Title:
Sub-surface Watering of Tree Seedlings in Arid Regions Using Discarded Plastic Infusion Sets
Author:
Koarkar, A. S.; Muthana, K. D.
Affiliation:
Central Arid Zone Research Institute
Publisher:
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Desert Plants
Rights:
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.
Collection Information:
Desert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.
Issue Date:
1984
Abstract:
The difficulty of establishing tree plantations in arid regions, particularly on sandy and droughty soils, is a widely faced problem. Insufficient water is freely available in such regions for effective watering of tree plantations with conventional methods. Under such conditions, discarded plastic infusion sets from a hospital were tried for watering and establishing Anjan (Hardwickia binata). This allowed use of a limited quantity of water, in a regulated way as in the drip system, and watering directly in the sub -soil to reduce evaporation loss. Either one litre or half a litre of water was applied per plant this way every alternate day for the whole year, with total consumption of 173 litres and 91 litres of water respectively per plant in the entire year. Growth of these plants was compared with growth of ones subjected to conventional watering with 9 litres applied fortnightly to make 216 litres of water per plant for the period of the experiment. Plant growth even with a half litre treatment on alternate days was far superior to that with conventional watering.
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0734-3434

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKoarkar, A. S.en
dc.contributor.authorMuthana, K. D.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-04T21:53:45Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-04T21:53:45Zen
dc.date.issued1984en
dc.identifier.issn0734-3434en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/552244en
dc.description.abstractThe difficulty of establishing tree plantations in arid regions, particularly on sandy and droughty soils, is a widely faced problem. Insufficient water is freely available in such regions for effective watering of tree plantations with conventional methods. Under such conditions, discarded plastic infusion sets from a hospital were tried for watering and establishing Anjan (Hardwickia binata). This allowed use of a limited quantity of water, in a regulated way as in the drip system, and watering directly in the sub -soil to reduce evaporation loss. Either one litre or half a litre of water was applied per plant this way every alternate day for the whole year, with total consumption of 173 litres and 91 litres of water respectively per plant in the entire year. Growth of these plants was compared with growth of ones subjected to conventional watering with 9 litres applied fortnightly to make 216 litres of water per plant for the period of the experiment. Plant growth even with a half litre treatment on alternate days was far superior to that with conventional watering.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceCALS Publications Archive. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleSub-surface Watering of Tree Seedlings in Arid Regions Using Discarded Plastic Infusion Setsen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCentral Arid Zone Research Instituteen
dc.identifier.journalDesert Plantsen
dc.description.collectioninformationDesert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.en_US
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