Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/552222
Title:
Plant Geography of Southwestern Sand Dunes
Author:
Bowers, Janice E.
Publisher:
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Desert Plants
Rights:
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.
Collection Information:
Desert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.
Issue Date:
1984
Abstract:
Patterns of plant distribution among eight dune fields in the southwestern USA and northwestern Mexico are analyzed and discussed. Each dune flora is characterized by three to five geographic components; the regional flora in which each dune field occurs is the dominant component. Endemic species, that is, species restricted to sand dunes, comprise ten percent or more of five of the eight floras. All possible combinations of the eight dune floras taken two at a time (28 pairs) were analyzed using Sorensen's similarity index. Only seven have a similarity value of 0.200 or greater. The lack of similarity among dune floras is due in part to their distribution among four floristically distinct biogeographic provinces and in part to localized recruitment of species from adjacent, non -dune plant communities. Geographic, edaphic and temporal barriers to dispersal and establishment also promote high dissimilarity among the eight floras. Eighty -three of the 533 species composing the eight dune floras are either endemic to sand dunes or occur at three or more of the dune fields studied. These 83 species fall into two subgroups: a group of 36 species characteristic of southwestern sand dunes east of 113° Longitude, and a group of 57 species characteristic of sand dunes west of 113° Longitude. Ten species are common to both groups. In the Southwest, dune fields are habitat islands, but dune floras do not behave in all respects as predicted by the MacArthur and Wilson theory of island biogeography. Southwestern sand dunes are not now floristic islands, but additional insular characteristics may develop over time.
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0734-3434

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBowers, Janice E.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-04T21:55:56Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-04T21:55:56Zen
dc.date.issued1984en
dc.identifier.issn0734-3434en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/552222en
dc.description.abstractPatterns of plant distribution among eight dune fields in the southwestern USA and northwestern Mexico are analyzed and discussed. Each dune flora is characterized by three to five geographic components; the regional flora in which each dune field occurs is the dominant component. Endemic species, that is, species restricted to sand dunes, comprise ten percent or more of five of the eight floras. All possible combinations of the eight dune floras taken two at a time (28 pairs) were analyzed using Sorensen's similarity index. Only seven have a similarity value of 0.200 or greater. The lack of similarity among dune floras is due in part to their distribution among four floristically distinct biogeographic provinces and in part to localized recruitment of species from adjacent, non -dune plant communities. Geographic, edaphic and temporal barriers to dispersal and establishment also promote high dissimilarity among the eight floras. Eighty -three of the 533 species composing the eight dune floras are either endemic to sand dunes or occur at three or more of the dune fields studied. These 83 species fall into two subgroups: a group of 36 species characteristic of southwestern sand dunes east of 113° Longitude, and a group of 57 species characteristic of sand dunes west of 113° Longitude. Ten species are common to both groups. In the Southwest, dune fields are habitat islands, but dune floras do not behave in all respects as predicted by the MacArthur and Wilson theory of island biogeography. Southwestern sand dunes are not now floristic islands, but additional insular characteristics may develop over time.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceCALS Publications Archive. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titlePlant Geography of Southwestern Sand Dunesen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalDesert Plantsen
dc.description.collectioninformationDesert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.en_US
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