LONGITUDINAL ASSESSMENT OF END‐OF‐LIFE DECISIONS BY MEDICAL STUDENTS, RESIDENTS AND ATTENDINGS FOR PEDIATRIC CASES

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/550116
Title:
LONGITUDINAL ASSESSMENT OF END‐OF‐LIFE DECISIONS BY MEDICAL STUDENTS, RESIDENTS AND ATTENDINGS FOR PEDIATRIC CASES
Author:
Sinha, Natasha
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
14-Apr-2015
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
End‐of‐life (EOL) care and decision‐making in pediatrics is a challenging and complex aspect of patient care experienced by residents and physician attendings. Previous studies have evaluated determinants that contribute to physicians’ attitudes towards EOL care as well as preparedness of students and residents in EOL decision‐making. However, the determinants contributing to a physician’s ability to make such decisions and feel confident in addressing EOL issues are dynamic. Recognizing that decision‐making changes over time, identifying when these changes occur may demonstrate the need for educational interventions for medical students and residents early in their career to help prepare them for EOL decision‐making. A longitudinal assessment of changes in attitudes and knowledge of EOL discussions and how they impact EOL decision‐making was not previously evaluated. This preliminary study establishes a baseline for medical student, resident, and attendings for EOL decision‐making and those factors that contribute to their decisions. This preliminary data has demonstrated a difference amongst attendings compared to residents and students. Despite low probability of survival, residents and students are more likely to select more aggressive management options when compared to attendings. Data obtained after completion of future surveys will show when decision‐making changes, which factors contribute to these changes and their significance in making decisions, and when participants are comfortable addressing EOL care.
Keywords:
End of Life Care; Attending Physicians; Residents; Longitudinal Assessment
MeSH Subjects:
Students, Medical; Terminal Care; Pediatrics; Medical Staff, Hospital
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Beyda, David MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleLONGITUDINAL ASSESSMENT OF END‐OF‐LIFE DECISIONS BY MEDICAL STUDENTS, RESIDENTS AND ATTENDINGS FOR PEDIATRIC CASESen_US
dc.contributor.authorSinha, Natashaen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.date.issued2015-04-14en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractEnd‐of‐life (EOL) care and decision‐making in pediatrics is a challenging and complex aspect of patient care experienced by residents and physician attendings. Previous studies have evaluated determinants that contribute to physicians’ attitudes towards EOL care as well as preparedness of students and residents in EOL decision‐making. However, the determinants contributing to a physician’s ability to make such decisions and feel confident in addressing EOL issues are dynamic. Recognizing that decision‐making changes over time, identifying when these changes occur may demonstrate the need for educational interventions for medical students and residents early in their career to help prepare them for EOL decision‐making. A longitudinal assessment of changes in attitudes and knowledge of EOL discussions and how they impact EOL decision‐making was not previously evaluated. This preliminary study establishes a baseline for medical student, resident, and attendings for EOL decision‐making and those factors that contribute to their decisions. This preliminary data has demonstrated a difference amongst attendings compared to residents and students. Despite low probability of survival, residents and students are more likely to select more aggressive management options when compared to attendings. Data obtained after completion of future surveys will show when decision‐making changes, which factors contribute to these changes and their significance in making decisions, and when participants are comfortable addressing EOL care.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subjectEnd of Life Careen
dc.subjectAttending Physiciansen
dc.subjectResidentsen
dc.subjectLongitudinal Assessmenten
dc.subject.meshStudents, Medicalen
dc.subject.meshTerminal Careen
dc.subject.meshPediatricsen
dc.subject.meshMedical Staff, Hospitalen
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.contributor.mentorBeyda, David MDen
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