Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/538763
Title:
VARIABLES IMPACTING DENGUE SURVEILLANCE IN KEY WEST FLORIDA
Author:
Raza, Ali
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
13-Apr-2015
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Background: Dengue fever is the most common mosquito borne viral disease in the world. Its symptoms can be fairly nonspecific and most commonly include fever, rash, headache, and eye pain. Passive surveillance is currently the most prevalent method used to detect dengue cases in the United States. Identification of positive cases can be limited by the public’s awareness of the disease’s symptoms, barriers to healthcare seeking behavior, and by physician approval of laboratory testing. Objective: This study sought to evaluate barriers to dengue reporting, as well as the patient‐ level factors that may limit the efficacy of passive surveillance of dengue in Key West, Florida. Methods: Cross‐sectional surveys were administered across Key West, FL. Subjects were asked if they had a recent fever, additional dengue symptoms, and whether they sought medical care for these symptoms. Also the hypothetical question was posed: would you seek medical care for a fever greater than 102 F? Responses were stratified according to patient characteristics and demographics. Results: In Key West, patient‐level factors that influenced the decision to seek medical care for a high fever were: having a specific doctor call when sick (p<0.006), health insurance status (p<0.037), and ethnicity (p<0.005). Additionally, barriers to dengue reporting were identified. The most impactful were the decision to seek medical care for symptoms consistent with dengue fever, and the doctor’s decision to administer confirmatory dengue laboratory tests. Only one person with a recent fever plus one additional classic dengue symptom received laboratory testing, and this was done outside of the United States. There were four individuals who met the current WHO clinical case definition for dengue, yet none were offered laboratory testing or were diagnosed with the disease. Conclusion: This study shows that both patients and doctors in Key West, Florida underestimate the potential for dengue when there are symptoms consistent with the disease. As such, it is certainly possible that there have been unreported cases in the country.
Keywords:
Key West
MeSH Subjects:
Dengue; Florida
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Ernst, Kacey PhD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleVARIABLES IMPACTING DENGUE SURVEILLANCE IN KEY WEST FLORIDAen_US
dc.contributor.authorRaza, Alien
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.date.issued2015-04-13en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Dengue fever is the most common mosquito borne viral disease in the world. Its symptoms can be fairly nonspecific and most commonly include fever, rash, headache, and eye pain. Passive surveillance is currently the most prevalent method used to detect dengue cases in the United States. Identification of positive cases can be limited by the public’s awareness of the disease’s symptoms, barriers to healthcare seeking behavior, and by physician approval of laboratory testing. Objective: This study sought to evaluate barriers to dengue reporting, as well as the patient‐ level factors that may limit the efficacy of passive surveillance of dengue in Key West, Florida. Methods: Cross‐sectional surveys were administered across Key West, FL. Subjects were asked if they had a recent fever, additional dengue symptoms, and whether they sought medical care for these symptoms. Also the hypothetical question was posed: would you seek medical care for a fever greater than 102 F? Responses were stratified according to patient characteristics and demographics. Results: In Key West, patient‐level factors that influenced the decision to seek medical care for a high fever were: having a specific doctor call when sick (p<0.006), health insurance status (p<0.037), and ethnicity (p<0.005). Additionally, barriers to dengue reporting were identified. The most impactful were the decision to seek medical care for symptoms consistent with dengue fever, and the doctor’s decision to administer confirmatory dengue laboratory tests. Only one person with a recent fever plus one additional classic dengue symptom received laboratory testing, and this was done outside of the United States. There were four individuals who met the current WHO clinical case definition for dengue, yet none were offered laboratory testing or were diagnosed with the disease. Conclusion: This study shows that both patients and doctors in Key West, Florida underestimate the potential for dengue when there are symptoms consistent with the disease. As such, it is certainly possible that there have been unreported cases in the country.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subjectKey Westen
dc.subject.meshDengueen
dc.subject.meshFloridaen
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.contributor.mentorErnst, Kacey PhDen
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