DEMOGRAPHICS AND COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT AS DEFINED BY THE MONTREAL COGNITIVE ASSESSMENT IN A PHOENIX COMMUNITY MEMORY SCREEN

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/537658
Title:
DEMOGRAPHICS AND COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT AS DEFINED BY THE MONTREAL COGNITIVE ASSESSMENT IN A PHOENIX COMMUNITY MEMORY SCREEN
Author:
Parsons, Christine
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
13-Apr-2015
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Memory screening in the community promotes early detection of memory problems, as well as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related illnesses, and encourages appropriate intervention. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is a rapid and sensitive screening tool for cognitive impairment that can be readily employed at the clinical level, but little is known about its utility as a community screening tool. Also, little is known regarding the demographics of the population that presents for a community screen. The research aims to evaluate the demographics of the participants that attended community memory screens in the greater Phoenix metropolitan area and to evaluate the prevalence of screen positives using the MoCA. It is hypothesized that cognitive impairment will be significantly prevalent in the screened population and that age and family history of dementia will correlate with the presence of cognitive impairment. The study methods involve descriptive analysis and application of statistical tests to evaluate for significant relationships between demographic variables and MoCA scores. The population (n=346) had a mean age of 72 (SD =10.7), was primarily female (70%), primarily Caucasian (68%) and 86% had greater than a high school education. A 58% prevalence of cognitive impairment was found in the population as defined by the MoCA. Increased age, male gender, and non‐Caucasian race correlated with lower MoCA scores. Lower education correlated with lower MoCA scores despite the inherent educational correction in the MoCA. Diabetes and a family history of AD were not significant factors. Although the number of true positives following methodical diagnosis is unknown, given the validity of the MoCA in discerning cognitive impairment, the screen was likely worthwhile and supports more routine use of community memory screens. Variables identified that were associated with increased cognitive impairment better describe the population at risk and can be utilized to focus future screening efforts.
Keywords:
Phoenix (Ariz); Montreal Cognitive Assessment; Memory screening; Demographics
MeSH Subjects:
Demography; Mass Screening; Memory; Community Health Services; Mild Cognitive Impairment
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Yaari, Roy MD, MAS; Dougherty, Jan RN, MS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleDEMOGRAPHICS AND COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT AS DEFINED BY THE MONTREAL COGNITIVE ASSESSMENT IN A PHOENIX COMMUNITY MEMORY SCREENen_US
dc.contributor.authorParsons, Christineen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.date.issued2015-04-13en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractMemory screening in the community promotes early detection of memory problems, as well as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related illnesses, and encourages appropriate intervention. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is a rapid and sensitive screening tool for cognitive impairment that can be readily employed at the clinical level, but little is known about its utility as a community screening tool. Also, little is known regarding the demographics of the population that presents for a community screen. The research aims to evaluate the demographics of the participants that attended community memory screens in the greater Phoenix metropolitan area and to evaluate the prevalence of screen positives using the MoCA. It is hypothesized that cognitive impairment will be significantly prevalent in the screened population and that age and family history of dementia will correlate with the presence of cognitive impairment. The study methods involve descriptive analysis and application of statistical tests to evaluate for significant relationships between demographic variables and MoCA scores. The population (n=346) had a mean age of 72 (SD =10.7), was primarily female (70%), primarily Caucasian (68%) and 86% had greater than a high school education. A 58% prevalence of cognitive impairment was found in the population as defined by the MoCA. Increased age, male gender, and non‐Caucasian race correlated with lower MoCA scores. Lower education correlated with lower MoCA scores despite the inherent educational correction in the MoCA. Diabetes and a family history of AD were not significant factors. Although the number of true positives following methodical diagnosis is unknown, given the validity of the MoCA in discerning cognitive impairment, the screen was likely worthwhile and supports more routine use of community memory screens. Variables identified that were associated with increased cognitive impairment better describe the population at risk and can be utilized to focus future screening efforts.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subjectPhoenix (Ariz)en
dc.subjectMontreal Cognitive Assessmenten
dc.subjectMemory screeningen
dc.subjectDemographicsen
dc.subject.meshDemographyen
dc.subject.meshMass Screeningen
dc.subject.meshMemoryen
dc.subject.meshCommunity Health Servicesen
dc.subject.meshMild Cognitive Impairmenten
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.contributor.mentorYaari, Roy MD, MASen
dc.contributor.mentorDougherty, Jan RN, MSen
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