PILOT STUDY: A NOVEL APPROACH TO CASE‐BASED INSTRUCTION OF MEDICAL STUDENTS USING SIMULATION EDUCATION

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/528206
Title:
PILOT STUDY: A NOVEL APPROACH TO CASE‐BASED INSTRUCTION OF MEDICAL STUDENTS USING SIMULATION EDUCATION
Author:
Jugler, Tanner
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
10-Apr-2015
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
This pilot project explores medical student preference regarding simulation education in case based instruction (CBI) compared with the traditional Power Point lecture CBI. The study population consisted of volunteer first, second, third, and fourth year medical students. The subjects were randomized into control (traditional CBI) and intervention (simulation CBI) groups and preference data was collected via pre‐ and post‐survey administered before and after the activity. Preference was limited to enjoyment of learning activity and opinion of benefit on exams of the learning activity. T‐tests were applied to the data in order to determine statistical significance. Enjoyment of the simulation activity was determined to be higher post‐simulation activity in the intervention group compared to the control group. While opinion that simulation CBI may be beneficial in regard to exam scores and knowledge retention was above neutral for the two groups, this study did not determine a significance in opinion between the control and intervention groups. The study results suggest that students who have experienced a simulation CBI enjoy them more compared to the traditional CBI and are more in favor of changing the current model of case‐based instruction.
Keywords:
Case Based Instruction; Simulation Education
MeSH Subjects:
Students, Medical
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Hartmark‐Hill, Jennifer MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePILOT STUDY: A NOVEL APPROACH TO CASE‐BASED INSTRUCTION OF MEDICAL STUDENTS USING SIMULATION EDUCATIONen_US
dc.contributor.authorJugler, Tanneren
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.date.issued2015-04-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractThis pilot project explores medical student preference regarding simulation education in case based instruction (CBI) compared with the traditional Power Point lecture CBI. The study population consisted of volunteer first, second, third, and fourth year medical students. The subjects were randomized into control (traditional CBI) and intervention (simulation CBI) groups and preference data was collected via pre‐ and post‐survey administered before and after the activity. Preference was limited to enjoyment of learning activity and opinion of benefit on exams of the learning activity. T‐tests were applied to the data in order to determine statistical significance. Enjoyment of the simulation activity was determined to be higher post‐simulation activity in the intervention group compared to the control group. While opinion that simulation CBI may be beneficial in regard to exam scores and knowledge retention was above neutral for the two groups, this study did not determine a significance in opinion between the control and intervention groups. The study results suggest that students who have experienced a simulation CBI enjoy them more compared to the traditional CBI and are more in favor of changing the current model of case‐based instruction.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subjectCase Based Instructionen
dc.subjectSimulation Educationen
dc.subject.meshStudents, Medicalen
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.contributor.mentorHartmark‐Hill, Jennifer MDen
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