CULTURAL BIAS IN MEMORY SCREENING OF AMERICAN INDIAN INDIVIDUALS IN ARIZONA

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/528184
Title:
CULTURAL BIAS IN MEMORY SCREENING OF AMERICAN INDIAN INDIVIDUALS IN ARIZONA
Author:
Ewbank, Clifton
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
10-Apr-2015
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Purpose: compare the Southwestern Indigenous Cognitive Assessment (SWICA), a novel tool for screening AI older adults in Arizona, with The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), a commonly used memory screening tool, for comparison of cultural bias. Methods: Cultural bias was assessed by retrospectively comparing coded participant responses to 16 questions about their cultural context. Intrasample variation on MoCA and SWICA tests was controlled by using the participants as their own controls. Data were analyzed using a multiple regression general linear model on SPSS software. Results: Scores on the SWICA test were independently associated with English use in the home (Beta = .396, p = .026), years of education (Beta = 335, p = .027), and ease of learning (Beta = .361, p = .029), but not age (Beta = .366, p = .054). Scores on the MoCA test were independently associated with age (Beta = ‐.491, p = .001), English use in the home (Beta = ‐.320, p = .039) , and years of education (Beta = ‐.284. p = .030), but not ease of learning (Beta = ‐.267, p = .067). Conclusions: Scores were similar on both tests (t=3.934, p=.001), and were independently associated with English use in the home and years of education. SWICA was uniquely associated with ease of learning and MoCA was uniquely associated with age. This preliminary comparison demonstrates the usefulness of SWICA, and validation of this tool is recommended.
Keywords:
Cultural bias; Memory screening; American Indians
MeSH Subjects:
Memory; Mass Screening; Arizona; Indians, North American
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Dougherty, Jan MS, RN, FAAN; Lomay, Vicky PhD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCULTURAL BIAS IN MEMORY SCREENING OF AMERICAN INDIAN INDIVIDUALS IN ARIZONAen_US
dc.contributor.authorEwbank, Cliftonen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.date.issued2015-04-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractPurpose: compare the Southwestern Indigenous Cognitive Assessment (SWICA), a novel tool for screening AI older adults in Arizona, with The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), a commonly used memory screening tool, for comparison of cultural bias. Methods: Cultural bias was assessed by retrospectively comparing coded participant responses to 16 questions about their cultural context. Intrasample variation on MoCA and SWICA tests was controlled by using the participants as their own controls. Data were analyzed using a multiple regression general linear model on SPSS software. Results: Scores on the SWICA test were independently associated with English use in the home (Beta = .396, p = .026), years of education (Beta = 335, p = .027), and ease of learning (Beta = .361, p = .029), but not age (Beta = .366, p = .054). Scores on the MoCA test were independently associated with age (Beta = ‐.491, p = .001), English use in the home (Beta = ‐.320, p = .039) , and years of education (Beta = ‐.284. p = .030), but not ease of learning (Beta = ‐.267, p = .067). Conclusions: Scores were similar on both tests (t=3.934, p=.001), and were independently associated with English use in the home and years of education. SWICA was uniquely associated with ease of learning and MoCA was uniquely associated with age. This preliminary comparison demonstrates the usefulness of SWICA, and validation of this tool is recommended.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subjectCultural biasen
dc.subjectMemory screeningen
dc.subjectAmerican Indiansen
dc.subject.meshMemoryen
dc.subject.meshMass Screeningen
dc.subject.meshArizonaen
dc.subject.meshIndians, North Americanen
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.contributor.mentorDougherty, Jan MS, RN, FAANen
dc.contributor.mentorLomay, Vicky PhDen
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