ASSESSING PHYSICIAN‐PARENT COMMUNICATION DURING EMERGENCY MEDICAL PROCEDURES IN CHILDREN: AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE EFFICACY OF THE INFORMED CONSENT PROCESS IN A LOW‐LITERACY LATINO PATIENT POPULATION

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/528182
Title:
ASSESSING PHYSICIAN‐PARENT COMMUNICATION DURING EMERGENCY MEDICAL PROCEDURES IN CHILDREN: AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE EFFICACY OF THE INFORMED CONSENT PROCESS IN A LOW‐LITERACY LATINO PATIENT POPULATION
Author:
Dahl, Aaron
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
10-Apr-2015
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objective: Effective physician‐patient communication is critical to the clinical decision making process. The informed consent process for any intervention can be one of the most important moments for effective physician‐patient communication in regards to outcome and liability. We studied parental recall of information provided during an informed consent discussion process prior to performance of emergency medical procedures in a pediatric emergency department of an inner city hospital with a large bi‐lingual population. Methods: Parent/child dyads undergoing emergency medical procedures were surveyed prospectively in English/Spanish, post‐procedure for recall of informed consent information. Logistic regression analysis was used; outcome variables were the ability to name a risk, a benefit, and an alternative to the procedure and predictors were language, education, and acculturation. Results: Fifty‐five parent/child dyads completed the survey. Logistic regression analysis showed that respondents with less than high school education were approximately 80% less likely to be able to name a risk or a benefit, while respondents with a high school education were approximately 24 times more likely to be able to name an alternative procedure. Conclusion: A gap in communication exists between physicians and patients during the consent taking; it is significantly impacted by socio‐demographic factors like education level, language and acculturation.
Keywords:
Physician-parent communication; Low-literacy; Latino
MeSH Subjects:
Emergency Medicine; Child; Child, Preschool; Observational Study as Topic; Informed Consent; Hispanic Americans; Communication
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Sinha, Madhumita MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleASSESSING PHYSICIAN‐PARENT COMMUNICATION DURING EMERGENCY MEDICAL PROCEDURES IN CHILDREN: AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE EFFICACY OF THE INFORMED CONSENT PROCESS IN A LOW‐LITERACY LATINO PATIENT POPULATIONen_US
dc.contributor.authorDahl, Aaronen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.date.issued2015-04-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractObjective: Effective physician‐patient communication is critical to the clinical decision making process. The informed consent process for any intervention can be one of the most important moments for effective physician‐patient communication in regards to outcome and liability. We studied parental recall of information provided during an informed consent discussion process prior to performance of emergency medical procedures in a pediatric emergency department of an inner city hospital with a large bi‐lingual population. Methods: Parent/child dyads undergoing emergency medical procedures were surveyed prospectively in English/Spanish, post‐procedure for recall of informed consent information. Logistic regression analysis was used; outcome variables were the ability to name a risk, a benefit, and an alternative to the procedure and predictors were language, education, and acculturation. Results: Fifty‐five parent/child dyads completed the survey. Logistic regression analysis showed that respondents with less than high school education were approximately 80% less likely to be able to name a risk or a benefit, while respondents with a high school education were approximately 24 times more likely to be able to name an alternative procedure. Conclusion: A gap in communication exists between physicians and patients during the consent taking; it is significantly impacted by socio‐demographic factors like education level, language and acculturation.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subjectPhysician-parent communicationen
dc.subjectLow-literacyen
dc.subjectLatinoen
dc.subject.meshEmergency Medicineen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshObservational Study as Topicen
dc.subject.meshInformed Consenten
dc.subject.meshHispanic Americansen
dc.subject.meshCommunicationen
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.contributor.mentorSinha, Madhumita MDen
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