CANCER PATIENT ATTITUDES TOWARDS INFLUENZA VACCINATION AND THE PREVALENCE OF VACCINATION IN CANCER PATIENTS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/528169
Title:
CANCER PATIENT ATTITUDES TOWARDS INFLUENZA VACCINATION AND THE PREVALENCE OF VACCINATION IN CANCER PATIENTS
Author:
Dulude, Alexandra
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
10-Apr-2015
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Introduction: Thousands of people die from influenza or its complications each year despite the fact that it is one of the few vaccine preventable diseases. Immunocompromised cancer patients are among the most vulnerable to this infection and flu‐related complications, and therefore vaccination is highly recommended in these patients; however, current vaccination rates and attitudes towards vaccination remain unknown. We hypothesize that immunization rates are lower than the 100% recommendation rate, and hope to understand the reasoning behind the discrepancy. The purpose of this study is to assess cancer patient attitudes towards influenza vaccination in an effort to minimize barriers to vaccination and eventually increase vaccination rates in this immunocompromised population. Methods: Cancer patients enrolled in phase I clinical oncology trials at the Virginia G Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare were invited to participate in a voluntary survey. The 15‐item survey consisted of demographic information, knowledge regarding the flu vaccine, vaccination status after cancer diagnosis and while on treatment, and general attitudes towards vaccination. A total of 84 cancer patients completed the survey. Results were stratified by age, gender, education level, and vaccination status. As this was a descriptive study, no statistical analyses were performed. Results: A total of 84 (n=84) advanced cancer patients enrolled in phase I clinical oncology trials completed the survey. Results indicate that although 71% of patients received the vaccine prior to cancer diagnosis, only 58% of patients have received the vaccine since their cancer diagnosis, and only 48% have been vaccinated while on cancer treatment. Of those vaccinated since cancer diagnosis, 94% reported doctor recommendation of the vaccine and most vaccinate to protect themselves from the virus. Of those not vaccinated since cancer diagnosis, only 37% report their doctor recommends the vaccine and the majority avoid vaccination because they believe the vaccine can cause the flu, they do not feel at risk of infection, and they do not believe the vaccine is effective. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that although the CDC strongly recommends influenza vaccination in cancer patients due to the risk of secondary complications and even death in these immunocompromised individuals, vaccination rates remain low. Our data demonstrates that patients who receive a doctor recommendation for the vaccine are more likely to be vaccinated, but not all doctors recommend the vaccine. Furthermore, false information regarding the vaccine, its efficacy, and its ability to cause infection continues to deter patients from vaccination. Together, this information offers profound insight into the cancer patient population and suggests the need for increased physician and patient education regarding the benefits of annual influenza vaccination to improve vaccination rates and decrease influenza infection and complications in the future.
Keywords:
Flu vaccine; Cancer patient
MeSH Subjects:
Influenza Vaccines; Patients; Neoplasms; Attitudes
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Ramanathan, Ramesh MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCANCER PATIENT ATTITUDES TOWARDS INFLUENZA VACCINATION AND THE PREVALENCE OF VACCINATION IN CANCER PATIENTSen_US
dc.contributor.authorDulude, Alexandraen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.date.issued2015-04-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Thousands of people die from influenza or its complications each year despite the fact that it is one of the few vaccine preventable diseases. Immunocompromised cancer patients are among the most vulnerable to this infection and flu‐related complications, and therefore vaccination is highly recommended in these patients; however, current vaccination rates and attitudes towards vaccination remain unknown. We hypothesize that immunization rates are lower than the 100% recommendation rate, and hope to understand the reasoning behind the discrepancy. The purpose of this study is to assess cancer patient attitudes towards influenza vaccination in an effort to minimize barriers to vaccination and eventually increase vaccination rates in this immunocompromised population. Methods: Cancer patients enrolled in phase I clinical oncology trials at the Virginia G Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare were invited to participate in a voluntary survey. The 15‐item survey consisted of demographic information, knowledge regarding the flu vaccine, vaccination status after cancer diagnosis and while on treatment, and general attitudes towards vaccination. A total of 84 cancer patients completed the survey. Results were stratified by age, gender, education level, and vaccination status. As this was a descriptive study, no statistical analyses were performed. Results: A total of 84 (n=84) advanced cancer patients enrolled in phase I clinical oncology trials completed the survey. Results indicate that although 71% of patients received the vaccine prior to cancer diagnosis, only 58% of patients have received the vaccine since their cancer diagnosis, and only 48% have been vaccinated while on cancer treatment. Of those vaccinated since cancer diagnosis, 94% reported doctor recommendation of the vaccine and most vaccinate to protect themselves from the virus. Of those not vaccinated since cancer diagnosis, only 37% report their doctor recommends the vaccine and the majority avoid vaccination because they believe the vaccine can cause the flu, they do not feel at risk of infection, and they do not believe the vaccine is effective. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that although the CDC strongly recommends influenza vaccination in cancer patients due to the risk of secondary complications and even death in these immunocompromised individuals, vaccination rates remain low. Our data demonstrates that patients who receive a doctor recommendation for the vaccine are more likely to be vaccinated, but not all doctors recommend the vaccine. Furthermore, false information regarding the vaccine, its efficacy, and its ability to cause infection continues to deter patients from vaccination. Together, this information offers profound insight into the cancer patient population and suggests the need for increased physician and patient education regarding the benefits of annual influenza vaccination to improve vaccination rates and decrease influenza infection and complications in the future.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subjectFlu vaccineen
dc.subjectCancer patienten
dc.subject.meshInfluenza Vaccinesen
dc.subject.meshPatientsen
dc.subject.meshNeoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshAttitudesen
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.contributor.mentorRamanathan, Ramesh MDen
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