EFFECTS OF REDUCED DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION FREQUENCIES IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/348460
Title:
EFFECTS OF REDUCED DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION FREQUENCIES IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE
Author:
Akhtar, Shaan
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Apr-2015
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is widely used and proven to be highly effective in helping alleviate symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Nevertheless, although high‐frequency DBS (>120 Hz) is initially effective in improving patients’ motor symptoms (mainly bradykinesia and tremors), many patients still develop gait disturbances, such as freezing of gait (FOG). Recent studies have reported that stimulation of the STN with low frequencies produce positive effects on gait disorders and reduces the number of FOG events. As research is being done to investigate how reduced DBS frequencies will affect gait and balance control, it is also important to understand what effects reduced DBS stimulation will have on their PD symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects that reduced DBS frequencies have on the severity of PD patients’ symptoms. The effects were studied in twelve PD patients (receiving DBS treatment) after reducing their DBS frequency. The varied DBS frequencies included: their clinically determined stimulation setting (CDS), a low stimulation setting (30 Hz), and an intermediate stimulation frequency (80 Hz). Symptom severity was measured using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS‐III), and the Hoehn‐Yahr (HY) stage score. The results were supportive of what we expected; that as DBS frequencies are decreased from the patients’ clinically determined setting, the clinical symptoms worsened. This is an important observation which will allow the appropriate clinical decisions be made as we continue to investigate the effects of reduced frequency DBS on gait and posture control.
Keywords:
BRAIN STIMULATION; PARKINSON’S DISEASE
MeSH Subjects:
Deep Brain Stimulation; Parkinson Disease
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Krishnamurthi, Narayanan PhD; Dhall, Rohit MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEFFECTS OF REDUCED DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION FREQUENCIES IN PARKINSON’S DISEASEen_US
dc.contributor.authorAkhtar, Shaanen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.date.issued2015-04en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2015 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractDeep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is widely used and proven to be highly effective in helping alleviate symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Nevertheless, although high‐frequency DBS (>120 Hz) is initially effective in improving patients’ motor symptoms (mainly bradykinesia and tremors), many patients still develop gait disturbances, such as freezing of gait (FOG). Recent studies have reported that stimulation of the STN with low frequencies produce positive effects on gait disorders and reduces the number of FOG events. As research is being done to investigate how reduced DBS frequencies will affect gait and balance control, it is also important to understand what effects reduced DBS stimulation will have on their PD symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects that reduced DBS frequencies have on the severity of PD patients’ symptoms. The effects were studied in twelve PD patients (receiving DBS treatment) after reducing their DBS frequency. The varied DBS frequencies included: their clinically determined stimulation setting (CDS), a low stimulation setting (30 Hz), and an intermediate stimulation frequency (80 Hz). Symptom severity was measured using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS‐III), and the Hoehn‐Yahr (HY) stage score. The results were supportive of what we expected; that as DBS frequencies are decreased from the patients’ clinically determined setting, the clinical symptoms worsened. This is an important observation which will allow the appropriate clinical decisions be made as we continue to investigate the effects of reduced frequency DBS on gait and posture control.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subjectBRAIN STIMULATIONen
dc.subjectPARKINSON’S DISEASEen
dc.subject.meshDeep Brain Stimulationen
dc.subject.meshParkinson Diseaseen
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.contributor.mentorKrishnamurthi, Narayanan PhDen
dc.contributor.mentorDhall, Rohit MDen
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