Anti-Affirmative Action Legislation in California Universities: Whitening the Ivory Towers

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/347182
Title:
Anti-Affirmative Action Legislation in California Universities: Whitening the Ivory Towers
Author:
Kontak, Nicole
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This multi case study examined how leaders of color narrated their experiences regarding access to leadership positions at two universities in California before and after Proposition 209 (California's anti-affirmative action legislation) was enacted in 1996. The research focused on addressing a gap in the literature with regards to professionals of color and the barriers they may have faced in the hiring process in an era of anti-affirmative action legislation. Semi-structured interviews of eighteen Student Affairs leaders of color (with job descriptions no lower than assistant director) were conducted. In addition, critical discourse analysis as outlined by Fairclough (1995) was used to analyze affirmative action plans from both institutions before and after Proposition 209. Cultural capital and critical race theory were the theoretical frameworks used to analyze the participant narratives and the discourse within the affirmative action plans. Findings included: qualifications being more important than cultural forms of knowledge, more diversity among director level positions, the hiring process being described as complex and lengthy, the importance of professional mentors, and leaders of color needing to assimilate to valued norms representative of the status quo to be successful in the hiring process as well as in their professional work environments. Recommendations for further research as well as recommendations for leadership development for professionals of color in higher education institutions is discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Affirmative Action Plans; Student Affairs; Affirmative Action; Educational Leadership
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Leadership
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ylimaki, Rose

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAnti-Affirmative Action Legislation in California Universities: Whitening the Ivory Towersen_US
dc.creatorKontak, Nicoleen_US
dc.contributor.authorKontak, Nicoleen_US
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis multi case study examined how leaders of color narrated their experiences regarding access to leadership positions at two universities in California before and after Proposition 209 (California's anti-affirmative action legislation) was enacted in 1996. The research focused on addressing a gap in the literature with regards to professionals of color and the barriers they may have faced in the hiring process in an era of anti-affirmative action legislation. Semi-structured interviews of eighteen Student Affairs leaders of color (with job descriptions no lower than assistant director) were conducted. In addition, critical discourse analysis as outlined by Fairclough (1995) was used to analyze affirmative action plans from both institutions before and after Proposition 209. Cultural capital and critical race theory were the theoretical frameworks used to analyze the participant narratives and the discourse within the affirmative action plans. Findings included: qualifications being more important than cultural forms of knowledge, more diversity among director level positions, the hiring process being described as complex and lengthy, the importance of professional mentors, and leaders of color needing to assimilate to valued norms representative of the status quo to be successful in the hiring process as well as in their professional work environments. Recommendations for further research as well as recommendations for leadership development for professionals of color in higher education institutions is discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectAffirmative Action Plansen_US
dc.subjectStudent Affairsen_US
dc.subjectAffirmative Actionen_US
dc.subjectEducational Leadershipen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadershipen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorYlimaki, Roseen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYlimaki, Roseen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBennett, Jeffreyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHumphrey, Keithen_US
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