Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/347144
Title:
Autonomic Cloud Resource Management
Author:
Tunc, Cihan
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 27-Jul-2015
Abstract:
The power consumption of data centers and cloud systems has increased almost three times between 2007 and 2012. The traditional resource allocation methods are typically designed for high performance as the primary objective to support peak resource requirements. However, it is shown that server utilization is between 12% and 18%, while the power consumption is close to those at peak loads. Hence, there is a pressing need for devising sophisticated resource management approaches. State of the art dynamic resource management schemes typically rely on only a single resource such as core number, core speed, memory, disk, and network. There is a lack of fundamental research on methods addressing dynamic management of multiple resources and properties with the objective of allocating just enough resources for each workload to meet quality of service requirements while optimizing for power consumption. The main focus of this dissertation is to simultaneously manage power and performance for large cloud systems. The objective of this research is to develop a framework of performance and power management and investigate a general methodology for an integrated autonomic cloud management. In this dissertation, we developed an autonomic management framework based on a novel data structure, AppFlow, used for modeling current and near-term future cloud application behavior. We have developed the following capabilities for the performance and power management of the cloud computing systems: 1) online modeling and characterizing the cloud application behavior and resource requirements; 2) predicting the application behavior to proactively optimize its operations at runtime; 3) a holistic optimization methodology for performance and power using number of cores, CPU frequency, and memory amount; and 4) an autonomic cloud management to support the dynamic change in VM configurations at runtime to simultaneously optimize multiple objectives including performance, power, availability, etc. We validated our approach using RUBiS benchmark (emulating eBay), on an IBM HS22 blade server. Our experimental results showed that our approach can lead to a significant reduction in power consumption upto 87% when compared to the static resource allocation strategy, 72% when compared to adaptive frequency scaling strategy, and 66% when compared to a multi-resource management strategy.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
cloud computing; cloud resource management; high performance computing; power minimization; ppw; Electrical & Computer Engineering; autonomic computing
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Electrical & Computer Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hariri, Salim; Akoglu, Ali

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAutonomic Cloud Resource Managementen_US
dc.creatorTunc, Cihanen_US
dc.contributor.authorTunc, Cihanen_US
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 27-Jul-2015en_US
dc.description.abstractThe power consumption of data centers and cloud systems has increased almost three times between 2007 and 2012. The traditional resource allocation methods are typically designed for high performance as the primary objective to support peak resource requirements. However, it is shown that server utilization is between 12% and 18%, while the power consumption is close to those at peak loads. Hence, there is a pressing need for devising sophisticated resource management approaches. State of the art dynamic resource management schemes typically rely on only a single resource such as core number, core speed, memory, disk, and network. There is a lack of fundamental research on methods addressing dynamic management of multiple resources and properties with the objective of allocating just enough resources for each workload to meet quality of service requirements while optimizing for power consumption. The main focus of this dissertation is to simultaneously manage power and performance for large cloud systems. The objective of this research is to develop a framework of performance and power management and investigate a general methodology for an integrated autonomic cloud management. In this dissertation, we developed an autonomic management framework based on a novel data structure, AppFlow, used for modeling current and near-term future cloud application behavior. We have developed the following capabilities for the performance and power management of the cloud computing systems: 1) online modeling and characterizing the cloud application behavior and resource requirements; 2) predicting the application behavior to proactively optimize its operations at runtime; 3) a holistic optimization methodology for performance and power using number of cores, CPU frequency, and memory amount; and 4) an autonomic cloud management to support the dynamic change in VM configurations at runtime to simultaneously optimize multiple objectives including performance, power, availability, etc. We validated our approach using RUBiS benchmark (emulating eBay), on an IBM HS22 blade server. Our experimental results showed that our approach can lead to a significant reduction in power consumption upto 87% when compared to the static resource allocation strategy, 72% when compared to adaptive frequency scaling strategy, and 66% when compared to a multi-resource management strategy.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectcloud computingen_US
dc.subjectcloud resource managementen_US
dc.subjecthigh performance computingen_US
dc.subjectpower minimizationen_US
dc.subjectppwen_US
dc.subjectElectrical & Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectautonomic computingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical & Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHariri, Salimen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAkoglu, Alien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHariri, Salimen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAkoglu, Alien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWang, Janeten_US
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