Application of Fluidic Lens Technology to an Adaptive Holographic Optical Element See-Through Auto-Phoropter

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/347085
Title:
Application of Fluidic Lens Technology to an Adaptive Holographic Optical Element See-Through Auto-Phoropter
Author:
Chancy, Carl Henri
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A device for performing an objective eye exam has been developed to automatically determine ophthalmic prescriptions. The closed loop fluidic auto-phoropter has been designed, modeled, fabricated and tested for the automatic measurement and correction of a patient's prescriptions. The adaptive phoropter is designed through the combination of a spherical-powered fluidic lens and two cylindrical fluidic lenses that are orientated 45° relative to each other. In addition, the system incorporates Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing technology to identify the eye's wavefront error and corresponding prescription. Using the wavefront error information, the fluidic auto-phoropter nulls the eye's lower order wavefront error by applying the appropriate volumes to the fluidic lenses. The combination of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor the fluidic auto-phoropter allows for the identification and control of spherical refractive error, as well as cylinder error and axis; thus, creating a truly automated refractometer and corrective system. The fluidic auto-phoropter is capable of correcting defocus error ranging from −20D to 20D and astigmatism from −10D to 10D. The transmissive see-through design allows for the observation of natural scenes through the system at varying object planes with no additional imaging optics in the patient's line of sight. In this research, two generations of the fluidic auto-phoropter are designed and tested; the first generation uses traditional glass optics for the measurement channel. The second generation of the fluidic auto-phoropter takes advantage of the progress in the development of holographic optical elements (HOEs) to replace all the traditional glass optics. The addition of the HOEs has enabled the development of a more compact, inexpensive and easily reproducible system without compromising its performance. Additionally, the fluidic lenses were tested during a National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) parabolic flight campaign, to determine the effect of varying gravitational acceleration on the performance and image quality of the fluidic lenses. Wavefront analysis has indicated that flight turbulence and the varying levels of gravitational acceleration ranging from zero-G (microgravity) to 2G (hypergravity) had minimal effect on the performance of the fluidic lenses, except for small changes in defocus; making them suitable for potential use in a portable space-based fluidic auto-phoropter.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Auto-Phoropter; Fluidic Lenses; Optical Sciences; Adaptive Optics
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Schwiegerling, James

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleApplication of Fluidic Lens Technology to an Adaptive Holographic Optical Element See-Through Auto-Phoropteren_US
dc.creatorChancy, Carl Henrien_US
dc.contributor.authorChancy, Carl Henrien_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA device for performing an objective eye exam has been developed to automatically determine ophthalmic prescriptions. The closed loop fluidic auto-phoropter has been designed, modeled, fabricated and tested for the automatic measurement and correction of a patient's prescriptions. The adaptive phoropter is designed through the combination of a spherical-powered fluidic lens and two cylindrical fluidic lenses that are orientated 45° relative to each other. In addition, the system incorporates Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing technology to identify the eye's wavefront error and corresponding prescription. Using the wavefront error information, the fluidic auto-phoropter nulls the eye's lower order wavefront error by applying the appropriate volumes to the fluidic lenses. The combination of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor the fluidic auto-phoropter allows for the identification and control of spherical refractive error, as well as cylinder error and axis; thus, creating a truly automated refractometer and corrective system. The fluidic auto-phoropter is capable of correcting defocus error ranging from −20D to 20D and astigmatism from −10D to 10D. The transmissive see-through design allows for the observation of natural scenes through the system at varying object planes with no additional imaging optics in the patient's line of sight. In this research, two generations of the fluidic auto-phoropter are designed and tested; the first generation uses traditional glass optics for the measurement channel. The second generation of the fluidic auto-phoropter takes advantage of the progress in the development of holographic optical elements (HOEs) to replace all the traditional glass optics. The addition of the HOEs has enabled the development of a more compact, inexpensive and easily reproducible system without compromising its performance. Additionally, the fluidic lenses were tested during a National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) parabolic flight campaign, to determine the effect of varying gravitational acceleration on the performance and image quality of the fluidic lenses. Wavefront analysis has indicated that flight turbulence and the varying levels of gravitational acceleration ranging from zero-G (microgravity) to 2G (hypergravity) had minimal effect on the performance of the fluidic lenses, except for small changes in defocus; making them suitable for potential use in a portable space-based fluidic auto-phoropter.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectAuto-Phoropteren_US
dc.subjectFluidic Lensesen_US
dc.subjectOptical Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectAdaptive Opticsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSchwiegerling, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchwiegerling, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPeyghambarian, Nasseren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPeyman, Gholamen_US
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