Advanced Practice Nurses' Self-Efficacy to Treat Intimate Partner Violence as Related to Professional, Workplace and Personal Factors

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/344226
Title:
Advanced Practice Nurses' Self-Efficacy to Treat Intimate Partner Violence as Related to Professional, Workplace and Personal Factors
Author:
McCall, Marla Kyo Yamato
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 8-Dec-2015
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine the professional, workplace and personal factors that significantly relate to advanced practice nurses' (APNs) self-efficacy to treat intimate partner violence (IPV).Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: IPV affects one in three women in the U.S. and is the leading cause of maternal death during the prenatal and first year post-partum periods. Older women victims suffer earlier death from all causes. IPV is under diagnosed and undertreated based on large surveys of emergency departments and outpatient clinics. APNs are providing health care to large numbers of potential victims, thus they are important as diagnosticians and treating clinicians. Methods: A national quantitative survey of APNs was performed with the aim of obtaining APNs from diverse specialties, geographic areas, and demographics within the U.S. Participants completed an electronic survey using modifications of standardized questionnaires on professional factors of hours of previous IPV education, IPV knowledge, years in practice, current practices, role belief, and self-efficacy to treat IPV. A new scale was developed to test workplace factors of screening tools and protocols, institutional, and community supports. Personal factors of age, gender, past IPV experience, vicarious trauma (VT), resilience, and general self-efficacy were tested using previously validated tools. Results: A sample of 494 APNs was obtained. Respondents were demographically representative of U.S. practicing APN population. Findings from this study indicate that APNs' current self-reported practice behaviors regarding IPV, total hours of IPV education, age in years, role belief, resilience, absence of VT and IPV knowledge are the most significant contributors to APNs' self-efficacy to treat IPV. Implications: APNs with strong clinical experience with IPV, more hours of IPV education, older age, belief that it is their role to treat IPV, and greater IPV knowledge, reported the best self-efficacy to treat IPV. Educational institutions should provide more formal and ongoing education in IPV. VT in APNs who treat IPV should be further explored. Health care organizations should provide continuing IPV education and provide work environments that promote the treatment of IPV for APNs to effectively identify and engage in treatment those patients who may be victims.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
intimate partner violence; practices; resilience; self-efficacy to treat IPV; vicarious trauma; Nursing; advanced practice nurses
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reed, Pamela G.; Jones, Elaine G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAdvanced Practice Nurses' Self-Efficacy to Treat Intimate Partner Violence as Related to Professional, Workplace and Personal Factorsen_US
dc.creatorMcCall, Marla Kyo Yamatoen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCall, Marla Kyo Yamatoen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 8-Dec-2015en_US
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine the professional, workplace and personal factors that significantly relate to advanced practice nurses' (APNs) self-efficacy to treat intimate partner violence (IPV).Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: IPV affects one in three women in the U.S. and is the leading cause of maternal death during the prenatal and first year post-partum periods. Older women victims suffer earlier death from all causes. IPV is under diagnosed and undertreated based on large surveys of emergency departments and outpatient clinics. APNs are providing health care to large numbers of potential victims, thus they are important as diagnosticians and treating clinicians. Methods: A national quantitative survey of APNs was performed with the aim of obtaining APNs from diverse specialties, geographic areas, and demographics within the U.S. Participants completed an electronic survey using modifications of standardized questionnaires on professional factors of hours of previous IPV education, IPV knowledge, years in practice, current practices, role belief, and self-efficacy to treat IPV. A new scale was developed to test workplace factors of screening tools and protocols, institutional, and community supports. Personal factors of age, gender, past IPV experience, vicarious trauma (VT), resilience, and general self-efficacy were tested using previously validated tools. Results: A sample of 494 APNs was obtained. Respondents were demographically representative of U.S. practicing APN population. Findings from this study indicate that APNs' current self-reported practice behaviors regarding IPV, total hours of IPV education, age in years, role belief, resilience, absence of VT and IPV knowledge are the most significant contributors to APNs' self-efficacy to treat IPV. Implications: APNs with strong clinical experience with IPV, more hours of IPV education, older age, belief that it is their role to treat IPV, and greater IPV knowledge, reported the best self-efficacy to treat IPV. Educational institutions should provide more formal and ongoing education in IPV. VT in APNs who treat IPV should be further explored. Health care organizations should provide continuing IPV education and provide work environments that promote the treatment of IPV for APNs to effectively identify and engage in treatment those patients who may be victims.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectintimate partner violenceen_US
dc.subjectpracticesen_US
dc.subjectresilienceen_US
dc.subjectself-efficacy to treat IPVen_US
dc.subjectvicarious traumaen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectadvanced practice nursesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReed, Pamela G.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorJones, Elaine G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBerg, Judith A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReed, Pamela G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Elaine G.en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.