Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/339044
Title:
Microstructural Analysis of Calcium-Aluminum-Rich Inclusions
Author:
Bolser, Diana
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Refractory materials are among the building blocks of our solar system and their chemistry and structure hold clues to understanding our origins. In this thesis I present a multifaceted approach toward understanding the histories of refractory materials within calcium-aluminum rich inclusions (CAIs) in primitive meteorites. I apply high-spatial resolution techniques including electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) enabled by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) to investigate CAI components and the Wark Lovering Rims that surround them to obtain information on microstructure and crystal chemistry in meteorites with varied pre-terrestrial histories. These inclusions possess three-dimensional grain islands, which exhibit crystallographic preferred orientations. The islands formed by high-temperature condensation in the solar nebula in a process driven by surface energy minimization, as shown by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. I also report preliminary results from laboratory experiments designed to synthesize perovskite under controlled temperature and oxygen fugacity (fO₂) conditions. The goal of this project was to develop a calibrated barometer based on changes in the oxidation state of Ti and apply the barometer to measurements of meteoritic samples in order to infer the thermodynamic conditions under which meteoritic perovskite formed in CAIs.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Chemistry
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ziurys, Lucy; Zega, Thomas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleMicrostructural Analysis of Calcium-Aluminum-Rich Inclusionsen_US
dc.creatorBolser, Dianaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBolser, Dianaen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRefractory materials are among the building blocks of our solar system and their chemistry and structure hold clues to understanding our origins. In this thesis I present a multifaceted approach toward understanding the histories of refractory materials within calcium-aluminum rich inclusions (CAIs) in primitive meteorites. I apply high-spatial resolution techniques including electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) enabled by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) to investigate CAI components and the Wark Lovering Rims that surround them to obtain information on microstructure and crystal chemistry in meteorites with varied pre-terrestrial histories. These inclusions possess three-dimensional grain islands, which exhibit crystallographic preferred orientations. The islands formed by high-temperature condensation in the solar nebula in a process driven by surface energy minimization, as shown by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. I also report preliminary results from laboratory experiments designed to synthesize perovskite under controlled temperature and oxygen fugacity (fO₂) conditions. The goal of this project was to develop a calibrated barometer based on changes in the oxidation state of Ti and apply the barometer to measurements of meteoritic samples in order to infer the thermodynamic conditions under which meteoritic perovskite formed in CAIs.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZiurys, Lucyen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZega, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZiurys, Lucyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZega, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMonti, Oliveren_US
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