Genetic Analysis of Cotton Evaluated under High Temperature and Water Deficit

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/338975
Title:
Genetic Analysis of Cotton Evaluated under High Temperature and Water Deficit
Author:
Dabbert, Timothy A.
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is cultivated in many contrasting production environments and is often subjected to a combination of abiotic stresses such as high temperature (heat) and water deficit (drought) stress. In the present dissertation, two recombinant inbred line populations were constructed from heat-tolerant and -susceptible parental lines and evaluated in multiple environments under the presence of two treatments, well-watered (heat stress) and water-limited in the presence of high temperature (combination of heat and drought stresses). We assessed two agronomic traits, seed cotton yield and lint yield, as well as six fiber traits, lint percent, micronaire, length, strength, uniformity, and elongation. Fiber traits had moderate to very high broad-sense heritabilities, while heritabilities of agronomic traits were lower for both populations in each irrigation regime. Correlations between traits were not effected by the irrigation regimes. A stability analysis across the range of environments tested demonstrated that high seed cotton yield performance and greater stability may play a role in tolerance to the combination of heat and drought stresses. Additionally, we constructed linkage maps for both recombinant inbred line populations and mapped QTL controlling variation all eight traits. A total of 138 QTL were identified across populations for the eight traits. Climate change in the form of rising temperatures and reduced water availability will increase the occurrence of the combination of heat and drought stresses in a farmer's field. Thus, current cotton breeding programs will need to focus on the development of cotton varieties tolerant to heat, drought, and the combination of the two.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
cotton; drought; heat; heritability; QTL; correlations; Plant Science
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Plant Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Feldmann, Kenneth

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleGenetic Analysis of Cotton Evaluated under High Temperature and Water Deficiten_US
dc.creatorDabbert, Timothy A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDabbert, Timothy A.en_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractUpland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is cultivated in many contrasting production environments and is often subjected to a combination of abiotic stresses such as high temperature (heat) and water deficit (drought) stress. In the present dissertation, two recombinant inbred line populations were constructed from heat-tolerant and -susceptible parental lines and evaluated in multiple environments under the presence of two treatments, well-watered (heat stress) and water-limited in the presence of high temperature (combination of heat and drought stresses). We assessed two agronomic traits, seed cotton yield and lint yield, as well as six fiber traits, lint percent, micronaire, length, strength, uniformity, and elongation. Fiber traits had moderate to very high broad-sense heritabilities, while heritabilities of agronomic traits were lower for both populations in each irrigation regime. Correlations between traits were not effected by the irrigation regimes. A stability analysis across the range of environments tested demonstrated that high seed cotton yield performance and greater stability may play a role in tolerance to the combination of heat and drought stresses. Additionally, we constructed linkage maps for both recombinant inbred line populations and mapped QTL controlling variation all eight traits. A total of 138 QTL were identified across populations for the eight traits. Climate change in the form of rising temperatures and reduced water availability will increase the occurrence of the combination of heat and drought stresses in a farmer's field. Thus, current cotton breeding programs will need to focus on the development of cotton varieties tolerant to heat, drought, and the combination of the two.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectcottonen_US
dc.subjectdroughten_US
dc.subjectheaten_US
dc.subjectheritabilityen_US
dc.subjectQTLen_US
dc.subjectcorrelationsen_US
dc.subjectPlant Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFeldmann, Kennethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFeldmann, Kennethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGore, Michael A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWalsh, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMay, Lloyden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWing, Roden_US
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